Foreword

ROGER BALDWIN Chairman, THE INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR THE RIGHTS OF MAN

Nobody who is concerned, as I am, with the many challenges to human rights in the activities of the United Nations, where I serve as a consultant, can fail to be deeply disturbed by the long deadlock in settling the Arab refugees from Palestine. Alone of all the millions of refugees in the world, these hundreds of thousands are a direct charge on the United Nations, which for ten desperate years have maintained them in and out of camps along the borders of Israel.

The responsibility of the United Nations is obvious; its partition resolution created Israel and the consequent war created the refugees. No service is rendered by arguing the conflicting contentions of the Israelis that the Arab states induced the refugees to flee or of the Arabs that Israeli terrorism drove them out. They escaped from a war brought on by United Nations action, and the U.N. accepted responsibility for them.

In the bitter controversy which has ensued neither side will yield to permit a solution. In this book, Dr. Peretz takes no sides nor does he offer a solution. He explores the contentions and states the long and tragic record. This is no mere academic study; he has steeped himself in the problem by long personal contacts with refugees, and with Arabs and Israelis alike. Both sides will charge prejudice because both are so presently irreconcilable. Yet Dr. Peretz is as balanced and fair as any man could be.

He raises questions which demand answers if these unhappy people, almost a million strong, are to find homes and useful lives when released from the demoralizing idleness of camps and displaced living on the tiny subsistence rations of seven cents a day from the United Nations Relief and Works Administration. Since over half of them are children under sixteen years of age, it is painfully apparent that we are faced with a human problem of saving young lives to usefulness beyond any challenge presented by refugees elsewhere.

-ix-

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Israel and the Palestine Arabs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface *
  • Chapter I - Introduction and Background 3
  • Notes 17
  • Chapter II - The Arab States and the Refugee Problem 19
  • Notes 30
  • Chapter III - Early Repatriation Attempts 33
  • Notes 56
  • Chapter IV - The Shift to an Economic Solution 58
  • Notes 70
  • Chapter V - The Failure of Repatriation Attempts 72
  • Notes 88
  • Chapter VI - Israel's Arab Minority and National Security 90
  • Notes 118
  • Chapter VII - Israel's Arab Minority and Social Integration 121
  • Notes 139
  • Chapter VIII - Israel's Initial Absentee Property Policy 141
  • Notes 164
  • Chapter IX - Absorption of Absentee Property 168
  • Notes 187
  • Chapter X - Early Problems of Compensation 192
  • Notes 201
  • Chapter XI - U.N. Progress on Problems of Compensation 203
  • Notes 219
  • Chapter XII - Blocked Accounts 222
  • Notes 237
  • Chapter XIII - Conclusions 240
  • Select Bibliography 249
  • Index 261
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