nomic and social change there. In Egypt there were also extensive programs for economic and social rehabilitation, although the difficulties facing the young officers directing the country's revolution were formidable. In all countries in the area there was a ferment of change which seemed to be stirring all layers of society and instilling in them a desire for material and social progress.


NOTES
1
CCP, Final Report of the United Nations Economic Survey Mission for the Middle East ( New York, 1949) Part I, p. 3.
2
No accurate count of refugees has ever been made. The figures presented yearly by UNRWA to the Secretary General of the UN are approximations based on ration lists. In many instances the ration lists have been found to be inflated. However, removal of individuals from the ration lists is often very difficult because of local political pressures. Often deaths are not registered, although most births are. Frequently non-refugees infiltrate the lists and it is difficult to determine who is and who is not qualified to receive rations. The Clapp Mission, basing its calculations on the population of Palestine in December, 1946, estimated that as of September 30, 1949 there were a total of 726,000 refugees (persons who fled from Israel-held territory), but a total of 1,019,243 "alleged relief recipients." The difference was accounted for by "duplicate registrations, destitute persons and other nonrepatriable relief recipients in the different areas." In Arab Palestine alone the Mission estimated that of the 431,500 alleged relief recipients, only 280,000 were persons who had fled from Israel-held territory. The difference was attributed to 69,157 local villagers who were being fed by the United Nations and a 20 percent duplication in the remainder. The country distribution of relief recipients and refugees in 1949 was as follows:
AreaAlleged Relief Recipients
30 September 1949
Persons Who Have
Fled from Israel
Arab Palestine431,500280,000
Egypt--7,000
Gaza ( Egypt held Palestine)210,987190,000
Iraq4,0004,000
Jordan100,90570,000
Lebanon140,448100,000
Syria83,40375,000
Total971,243726,000
Israel48,000*
GrandTotal1,019,243
* 31,000 Arabs and 17,000 Jews -- these represent individuals who fled from one
part of Israel to another as a result of the war.

These figures are from the Final Report of the United Nations Economic Survey Mission for the Middle East (Part 1), p. 23.

The country distribution of refugees and rations distributed between June 1950 and June 1957 according to UNRWA estimates was as follows:

-30-

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Israel and the Palestine Arabs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface *
  • Chapter I - Introduction and Background 3
  • Notes 17
  • Chapter II - The Arab States and the Refugee Problem 19
  • Notes 30
  • Chapter III - Early Repatriation Attempts 33
  • Notes 56
  • Chapter IV - The Shift to an Economic Solution 58
  • Notes 70
  • Chapter V - The Failure of Repatriation Attempts 72
  • Notes 88
  • Chapter VI - Israel's Arab Minority and National Security 90
  • Notes 118
  • Chapter VII - Israel's Arab Minority and Social Integration 121
  • Notes 139
  • Chapter VIII - Israel's Initial Absentee Property Policy 141
  • Notes 164
  • Chapter IX - Absorption of Absentee Property 168
  • Notes 187
  • Chapter X - Early Problems of Compensation 192
  • Notes 201
  • Chapter XI - U.N. Progress on Problems of Compensation 203
  • Notes 219
  • Chapter XII - Blocked Accounts 222
  • Notes 237
  • Chapter XIII - Conclusions 240
  • Select Bibliography 249
  • Index 261
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