ernment organization and economy, that little attention was given to the management policy of Arab refugee property. Only after much damage was done did the government become aware that the fragments of improvised policy which determined the use of this great national asset were seriously inadequate. By then, since political relations with the Arab states augured little hope of peace or an early return of refugees, the government acted accordingly. Instead of ad hoc decisions, it adopted an open and clear policy of absorbing Arab refugee property into the national economy.

Policy toward the owners was shaped by that toward their holdings. As it became clear that most of them would not return to Israel, steps were taken legally to end their property ownership there. Since much absentee property belonging to Israeli Arab residents was in strategic border areas, there was, at first, little or no distinction made between them and the refugees who fled from the country. The failure to separate management of property seized from Arab residents and that of the holdings left by those who fled, often resulted in inequitable treatment. But internal Jewish and Arab political pressures finally forced the government to attempt to rectify measures which were considered discriminatory. The Land Acquisition Law was enacted to compensate Arabs within the country who were victims of the previous failure to distinguish them from the Palestinians who were in enemy territory. But the discriminatory provisions of the Law met opposition from the minority and several Jewish groups.

Under international pressure, Israel finally evolved a compensation policy for the property of the Arabs who left the country. It did not give consideration to individual claims, but treated the issue on a global basis. Details of the political and technical problems of Arab refugee compensation are treated at length in the next two chapters.


NOTES
1
Israel Government, Reshumot, Sefer ha-Huqim, 1949/50, pp. 86-101: The Absentee Property Law, 5710- 1950, passed by the Kneset, Mar. 14, 1950: The government's bill introducing the legislation underwent only minor changes before it was enacted into a law by the Kneset. Jerusalem Post, Nov. 25, 1949.
2
Divrei ha-Kneset, Vol. III, p. 139; Government of India, Gazette of India Extraordinary, June 13, 1949, The Administration of Evacuee Property (Chief Commissioner's Provinces) Ordinance, 1949 (XII of 1949); Government of Pakistan, Ga zette of Pakistan Extraordinary, Ordinance no. XIX of 1948, published by the Ministry of Refugees and Rehabilitation, Oct. 18, 1948: ( Kaplan was apparently referring to the Pakistan legislation which permitted the central government to use abandoned property to repair the "dislocation in the economic life of the Do-

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Israel and the Palestine Arabs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface *
  • Chapter I - Introduction and Background 3
  • Notes 17
  • Chapter II - The Arab States and the Refugee Problem 19
  • Notes 30
  • Chapter III - Early Repatriation Attempts 33
  • Notes 56
  • Chapter IV - The Shift to an Economic Solution 58
  • Notes 70
  • Chapter V - The Failure of Repatriation Attempts 72
  • Notes 88
  • Chapter VI - Israel's Arab Minority and National Security 90
  • Notes 118
  • Chapter VII - Israel's Arab Minority and Social Integration 121
  • Notes 139
  • Chapter VIII - Israel's Initial Absentee Property Policy 141
  • Notes 164
  • Chapter IX - Absorption of Absentee Property 168
  • Notes 187
  • Chapter X - Early Problems of Compensation 192
  • Notes 201
  • Chapter XI - U.N. Progress on Problems of Compensation 203
  • Notes 219
  • Chapter XII - Blocked Accounts 222
  • Notes 237
  • Chapter XIII - Conclusions 240
  • Select Bibliography 249
  • Index 261
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 264

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.