The Middle East in Transition: Studies in Contemporary History

By Walter Z. Laqueur | Go to book overview

THE ISLAMIC COMMUNITY AND COMMUNISM

by DR. NABIH AMIN FARIS

IS ISLAM, because of its hostility to materialist atheistic beliefs, a guarantee against the spread of Communism among Muslims? The question has recently acquired more than academic interest and urgency. The world has been divided into two conflicting ideologies, each trying with all the means available to it to gain control over the minds of men everywhere. A large number of spokesmen, however, both in the West and among Muslims, have been reiterating that in this struggle Islam stands as a barrier against the onslaught of Communism. On the surface, this position seems assuring, but on closer investigation it loses all the talismanic charms with which its advocates endue it. In this study, the entire problem is examined in the light of traditional Muslim orthodoxy and current Islamic practice. Needless to say, the writer has no desire whatsoever to criticize either Islam or Communism. As a matter of fact, this article would never have been written had it not been specifically requested.

In reviewing a recently published book on the history of the Arabs,1 I concluded the review with the following observation:

'Another myth which seems to be as ubiquitous as flying saucers, and as unreal, is the claim that among the factors which stand a barrier against the spread of Communism in the Arab world is Islam's "hostility to a materialist, atheitsic creed and way of life". The reviewer is inclined to believe that Islam, in spite of its hostility to materialist atheistic creeds, is no guarantee against the spread of Communism at all, but perhaps a preparation for it. The final answer

____________________
1
Edward Atiyah, The Arabs ( London, Penguin Books Ltd., 1955). The review appeared in the Middle East Forum, Beirut, December, 1955, pp. 30-32.

-351-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Middle East in Transition: Studies in Contemporary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.