Control & Crisis in Colonial Kenya: The Dialectic of Domination

By Bruce Berman | Go to book overview

repair the relationship by encouraging indigenous capitalist forces among the Kikuyu, in order to reward the loyalists and restore them as an effective instrument of control and collaboration. At the same time, the state also constrained and limited that development in order to mute the internal class struggle it engendered among the Kikuyu by protecting the land of the middle peasantry. It gave them access to some of the material benefits of commodity production, and so forestalled a challenge to the position of the settler estate sphere. Second, consistent also with more haphazard and locally varied patterns of action analysed in earlier chapters, the state moved to regain control over access to major sources of wealth in the reserves, this time through a further and even more massive escalation of its increasingly centralized and bureaucratized control over production, marketing and finance in African agriculture. The task of legitimation, which had fallen by the wayside during the years before the Emergency, once again came to the fore. What was new at this point was that there was a conscious effort, accepted at the centre as official state policy, to increase the value of the surplus product retained and distributed within the reserves among both the wealthy petty bourgeoisie and the mass of middle peasants. Through this the state succeeded in its immediate objective of detaching the middle peasantry from its alliance with the landless and dispossessed extremists that lay behind the 'Mau Mau' struggle," thereby isolating the landless and enabling them to be crushed by the coercive power of the state, and also at least temporarily pasted over the contradiction between the petty bourgeoisie and the middle peasantry by emphasizing their common interest in landed property and commodity production. However, insofar as the reforms were predicated on the maintenance of established structures, the contradictions contained within the latter continued. As a result, the reforms failed to achieve the further objectives of restoring stability and legitimacy. Instead, they resulted in a series of unforeseen and unintended consequences that interacted with the increasing influence of the metropolitan state and capital finally to undermine fatally both the settler estate sphere and the colonial state itself.


Notes
1.
Interview 214F.
2.
Kenya National Archives, Nairobi (KNA), DC/MRU 1/9, 'Meru District Annual Report, 1953'.
3.
Interview 219F.
4.
John Spencer, 'KAU and "Mau Mau": some connections', paper presented to the conference on the Political Economy of Colonial Kenya, 1939-52, Cambridge

-371-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Control & Crisis in Colonial Kenya: The Dialectic of Domination
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 480

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.