Control & Crisis in Colonial Kenya: The Dialectic of Domination

By Bruce Berman | Go to book overview

instead of appearing a ruler and a source of power, becomes an insignificant, useless, feeble man. 26


Notes
1.
The development of settler capital was certainly more extensive in South Africa and Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), metropolitan industrial investment larger in the Belgian Congo as well as South Africa, and large elements of indigenous commercial capital were present in many West African colonies. It is the combination of these elements, not the scale of their presence, and their heavy impact on property and production relations in large areas of the countryside, that is unique in Kenya.
2.
On the post-independence development of the indigenous bourgeoisie in Kenya and the role of the state see the studies by Nicola Swainson, "'The rise of the Kenyan bourgeoisie'", Review of African Political Economy 8, 1977; "'State and economy in post- colonial Kenya'". Canadian Journal of African Studies 12, 1978; The Development of Corporate Capitalism in Kenya, London: Heinemann, 1980, especially Ch. 5; and by Colin Leys, "'Capital accumulation, class formation and dependency: the significance of the Kenyan case'", Socialist Register, 1978, London: Merlin, Press, 1978; "'Development strategy in Kenya since 1971'". Canadian Journal of African Studies 13( 1-2), 1979; "'State capital in Kenya: a research note'" (with Jane Borges & Hyam Gold), Canadian Journal of African Studies 14( 2), 1980.
3.
This general conclusion is reached from varied theoretical perspectives by Henry Bienen , Kenya: The Politics of Participation and Control, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1974, esp. Ch. 4; Colin Leys, Underdevelopment in Kenya, London: Heinemann, 1974, esp. pp. 193-8; and M. Tamarkin, "'The roots of political stability in Kenya'", African Affairs 77( 308), 1978.

As the government and bureaucracy have merged into one structure of power, other parts of the state and political organizations, especially the institutions of liberal democracy hastily created in the last years before independence, have decayed or disappeared. Thus the regional federal forms of the 'Majimbo' Constitution under which Kenya became independent, were abolished within a year and a unitary state restored because, in the blunt words of the Ndegwa Commission, they 'threatened the integrity of the State and the capacity of the Central Government to carry out its plans for development' ( Report of the Commission of Inquiry on Public Service Structure and Remuneration, Nairobi: Government Printer, 1971, p. 9). Parliament has declined into a dominated rubber-stamp (sometimes ex post facto) of executive action and a talking shop in which criticism of the government is tolerated within "conveniently undefined limits". ( Tamarkin, 'Roots of political stability', p. 303.) Meanwhile, the ostensible ruling party, KANU, has languished into an organization for the distribution of electoral patronage to political worthies and the ideological exhortation of the masses. In the countryside, the local government councils were brought under increasing state control and, in 1970, were emasculated when their major areas of responsibility for primary education, roads and health were assumed by central government departments. ( Bienen, Kenya, pp. 44-8.)

The melding of indigenous capital and the senior officialdom of the state was secured by the approval of private business holdings by civil servants by the Ndegwa Commission in 1971, which gave official sanction to the time-honoured Kenya practice

-441-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Control & Crisis in Colonial Kenya: The Dialectic of Domination
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 480

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.