Theory and Design in the First Machine Age

By Reyner Banham | Go to book overview

16: Progressive building in Paris: 1918-1928

THE SITUATION FACING Le Corbusier, or anyone else hoping to erect Modern buildings in Paris in the Nineteen-twenties, was stimulating, frustrating, and complicated.1 Intellectually architects might find themselves aspiring to build on a grand scale for a new mechanised society, but economically and socially they would often find themselves driven to erect small buildings of specialised type for a class of patrons they suspected as representatives of a dead social order. Hence their hatred of the established architectural order, of the École and the Academie--hence too their private feuds and passionate attachments to this master or that. The combination of intellectual abundance and physical restriction is one of the most striking features of this situation.

Intellectually, the climate of ideas could hardly have been richer, and remained so till the end of the decade. Extremist movements may have been short-lived, but they were replaceable. Futurism remained an active force until about the middle of the decade, the survivors of the heroic age of Cubism were still present. The freedoms of Dadaism may have proven unsubstantial, but they were succeeded after 1922 by the more organised programme of liberation of the Surrealists. Purism may have expired in 1925, but van Doesburg was at hand to provoke a ferment of Abstractionist activity toward the end of the decade. L'Esprit Nouveau may have expired with its parent movement, but L'Effort Moderne,2 last of the Cubist magazines, had already been appearing for almost two years, and there was also, by 1925, a magazine devoted specifically to progressive architecture, L'Architecture Vivante,3 edited by Albert Morancé and Jean Badovici .

These two last-named publications are important for their internationalism, giving considerable space to Dutch, German and Russian design,

____________________
1
Outside Le Corbusier ( Œuvre Complète, and similar publications about André Lurçat and Michel Roux-Spitz, the documentation of the buildings of Paris in this period is thin, and the coverage by periodicals almost non-existent. This chapter is therefore very deeply indebted to the personal reminiscences of Ernö Goldfinger, Pierre Vago and André Lurçat.
2
Began to appear in 1924.
3
Began to appear in 1923.

-214-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Theory and Design in the First Machine Age
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Acknowledgements 6
  • Illustrations 7
  • Introduction--The Machine Age 9
  • Section One 13
  • 1: the Academic Tradition and the Concept of Elementary Composition 14
  • 2: Choisy 23
  • 3: the Academic Succession 35
  • 4:England:Lethaby and Scott 44
  • 5: Germany 68
  • 6: the Factory Aesthetic 79
  • 7: Adolf Loos and the Problem of Ornament 88
  • Section Two 98
  • 8: Futurism 99
  • 9: Futurism: Theory and Development 106
  • 10: Sant'Elia and Futurist Architecture 127
  • Section Three 138
  • 11: Holland 139
  • 12: De Stijl: the Dutch Phase 148
  • 13: Expressionism 163
  • 14: De Stijl 185
  • Section Four 201
  • 15: Architecture and the Cubist Tradition 202
  • 16: Progressive Building in Paris 214
  • 17: Vers Une Architecture 220
  • 18: Le Corbusier 247
  • Section Five 264
  • 19: the Berlin School 265
  • 20: the Bauhaus 276
  • 21: Germany: the Encyclopaedics 305
  • 22: Conclusion 320
  • Index to Proper Names and Buildings 331
  • Index, to Topics, Publications, and Organisations 335
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.