American Federalism: A New Partnership for the Republic

By Robert B. Hawkins Jr. | Go to book overview

NOTES

6. Richard S. Williamson: "A Review of Reagan Federalism"
1.
Ronald Reagan, remarks to the National League of Cities, Washington, D.C., 2 March 1981.
2.
Idem, remarks before the Conservative Political Action Committee Conference, Washington, D.C., 20 March 1981.
3.
Idem, remarks to the National League of Cities, Washington, D.C., 2 March 1981.
4.
Idem, remarks made in the White House Briefing Room, 22 January 1981.
5.
The president's nomination of Sandra Day O'Connor to the Supreme Court should be seen through the federalism prism. Judge O'Connor is on record that federal courts are not necessarily more professional and nonpolitical than state courts. She has written that federal courts ought not necessarily to be the "preferred" forum for criminal or civil cases: "It is a step in the right direction to defer to the state courts and give finality to their judgments on federal constitutional questions where a full and fair adjudication has been given in the state court."
6.
Meeting between the president and forty-nine governors at the White House, 23 February 1981.
7.
The so-called "iron triangle" is made up of the special interest groups, the permanent federal bureaucracy, and Capitol Hill committee staff and members. All three sides of the iron triangle have large interests in protecting the status quo and expanding federal spending and federal control in the jurisdictional areas. They gain thereby more power, more prestige, and more money. Their relationships are incestuous. Most Washington special interest lobbyists are former employees from Capitol Hill or from the departments and agencies downtown. They now are paid for their grantsmanship and lobbying on laws, regulations, and programs they helped to design. And too often political contributions to members of Congress are dominated by special interests who lobby them on programs under the member's committee jurisdiction. This iron triangle, coupled with members of Congress who sincerely oppose any devolution as harmful, comprises substantial opposition to any New Federalism efforts.
8.
Margaret Hance, mayor of Phoenix, Arizona, in remarks on the "New Federalism" program of the "MacNeil-Lehrer Report," Educational Broadcasting Corporation, 9 July 1981. See also William H. Hudnut III, mayor of Indianapolis, Indiana, and president of the National League of Cities, in remarks on "The Future of State-Local Relations," annual meeting of the National Governors' Association, Atlantic City, New Jersey, 10 August 1981.
9.
Charles Royer, mayor of Seattle, Washington, "Can States Handle Role Reagan Is Giving Them?" The Washington Star, 4 May 1981. See also an eloquent rebuttal to Mayor Royer's charges by Governor George Busbee of Georgia, "A Governor Responds: ,"States Can Do the Job The Washington Star, 25 May 1981.

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