VII. Old Woman's Grandchild

IN THE beginning we Hidatsa [and] Crow were one and the same people. It was the Sun who spoke. Who were his companions I do not know; he had companions, it is said. "Come, of what tribe are the best-looking women, do you think?""Why, the Hidatsa are the ones that have the best-looking women, I think.""Now I'll marry, I think. I want to have a wife, that's why I ask you. If it is so, I shall marry a young Hidatsa woman. Then who, I wonder, is the most efficient suitor?" A porcupine spoke: "Why, my elder brother, my gift of speech is the best gift I have. If you hire me for courtship, I'll do it without trouble.""Well then, all right, now you shall go.""That will I," he said and set out.

These Hidatsa had a chief, his child was a young woman. This chief had a sister. This child of his, and his sister were about the same age. "Let us go, let us do quill-work; here it is hot, let us go away among the trees; in the shade there we'll do quill-work." They went. They entered the wood; a species of willow tree was leaning over, in its shade they did quill-work. They were passing the time embroidering without disturbance. Wherever he came from, the porcupine was by this leaning tree. "Comrade, look at that porcupine. Keep still, I'll catch it." This chief's daughter was the one who said it. She climbed the tree. Whenever this young woman got to the porcupine, he kept on going higher. Nevertheless she followed him. This paternal aunt of hers said: "Why, comrade, already you have gone exceedingly far. Turn back, come, stop.""No, I'll catch it."1 When this young woman's paternal aunt looked at her comrade she was dim [unrecognizable]; at last she no longer saw her. Then the Sun took her and carried her off. As she was coming, one white tipi was there. There she went, she came, she got there. Outdoors she stood still. "Come inside here, daughter." She came in. It was an old woman. This one inside was staying without anything

____________________
1
Yellow-brow pronounced the word for "I'll catch it" (burutsi'wiky) tripling the first "i" and raising the pitch.

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Crow Indians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • I - Tribal Organization 3
  • II - Kinship and Affnity 18
  • III - From Cradle to Grave 33
  • IV - The Workaday World 72
  • V - Literature 104
  • VI - Selected Tales 119
  • VII - Old Woman's Grandchild 134
  • VIII - Twined-Tail 158
  • IX - Club Life 172
  • X - War 215
  • XI - Religion 237
  • XII - Rites and Festivals 256
  • XIII - The Bear Song Dance 264
  • XIV - The Sacred Pipe Dance 269
  • XV - The Tobacco Society 274
  • XVI - The Sun Dance 297
  • XVII - World-View 327
  • Appendix I - Sources 335
  • Appendix II - Clan Names 340
  • Glossary 343
  • Index 345
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 350

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.