Appendix II: Clan Names

The list of clans (p. 9) may be regarded as more or less standard, but some additional names were recorded. For example, several informants made a trio of my first pair of linked clans by adding the ci″pte'tse (or ci″'te'tse), which means something like "the sound of a rebounding arrow." It was assuredly a popular name, since Morgan obtained it in the 'sixties, and Lewis and Clark noted it as "Ship-tah-cha" nearly a hundred and thirty years ago. But one of my best authorities regards this as a mere sobriquet of his own clan, the Thick Lodge.

To the Sore-lip group, several Crow add a Bad-legging (isā+″tskawìa) clan, but this is identified with the Greasy-insidethe-mouth people. Similarly, the name Muddy-water-drinkers (biricB+″cie) was given, but only to be explained as a synonym of the Sore-lips by another informant. One Indian also spoke of a Small Pipe (icB+″ptsiatse; literally, their pipes are small) clan as falling into this linkage.

The clan trio that forms my third clan combination had several additional designations assigned to it, such as Big-belliesmen (ē+éisā+″watse) and Their-horses-are-bad (isā+″cgye xawī+″ky), but they were regarded by trustworthy witnesses as merely synonymous for the ũ+″sawatsià and xu+″xkaraxtse, respectively. Again, the name, "Not Mixed" (ī+″cirā+″te) is clearly interchangeable with ũ+″sawatsi″a, for Lone-tree and Big-ox who classed themselves as the latter had given Mr. Curtis the other clan as theirs.

To the fourth group Arm-round-the-neck added the name "They-scrape-water" (biripā+″xua) as a synonym of the Bad War Honors. Hairy-legs (hurī+″wice) was a supplementary designation assigned to this clan linkage by an old couple but never mentioned by any one else.

Under the fifth head some place the Pretty Prairie-dogs (tsi'pa-wāi+″tse), Deer-eaters (ũ+″ux akdũ+″ce), and Lodge-thatdoes-not-look (acbatsī+″rice), the last of which is also put into class VI.

-340-

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The Crow Indians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • I - Tribal Organization 3
  • II - Kinship and Affnity 18
  • III - From Cradle to Grave 33
  • IV - The Workaday World 72
  • V - Literature 104
  • VI - Selected Tales 119
  • VII - Old Woman's Grandchild 134
  • VIII - Twined-Tail 158
  • IX - Club Life 172
  • X - War 215
  • XI - Religion 237
  • XII - Rites and Festivals 256
  • XIII - The Bear Song Dance 264
  • XIV - The Sacred Pipe Dance 269
  • XV - The Tobacco Society 274
  • XVI - The Sun Dance 297
  • XVII - World-View 327
  • Appendix I - Sources 335
  • Appendix II - Clan Names 340
  • Glossary 343
  • Index 345
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