Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

By Workers Of The Writers' Program | Go to book overview

Labor

BEFORE 1890 Wisconsin was an agricultural State. Industry was centered in a few eastern cities, particularly Milwaukee; only 2 to 4 per cent of the population was industrially employed; and wage-conscious labor was a relatively small element. But near the turn of the century came an expansion of industrialization. Increasing numbers of farmer boys were drawn into urban districts; 7 to 10 per cent of the population became wage earners, and the labor movement took on new significance to the State as a whole.

At the same time a spirit of liberalism was growing, expressed politically in the rise of the La Follette Progressive organization within the Republican Party and in a number of projects for governmental reform, which are referred to collectively as the "Wisconsin Idea." The fact that a powerful group opposed the new liberalism added zeal to the incessant crusades by which its aims were advanced.

Labor obtained considerable influence among those who were shaping the liberal tradition and consequently was able to avail itself of political action more fully here than in many States. To some extent legislative successes removed the necessity for economic action, and until recently Wisconsin ranked low in the proportion of workers organized in unions; but in the upsurge of the past few years a favorable political climate has contributed to the gains in organization made by labor, and Wisconsin is now one of the most completely unionized States.

Though labor has contributed to and benefited from Wisconsin liberalism, the benefits have not descended like manna. In order to attain its ends, labor has had to exercise unwearying vigilance and effort, for the Wisconsin liberal movement is largely agrarian and middle class rather than urban and wage-conscious. Nevertheless, labor here has been emancipated from the traditional Gompers strategy of waiting to see which of the two major parties might be inclined to trade a few concessions for a body of votes, of "rewarding your friends and punishing your enemies." The development of Socialism and Progressivism has to a considerable extent allowed Wisconsin labor to be openly and methodically partisan and to reap the fruits of partisan victories.

The close of the Civil War brought a Nation-wide unrest among industrial workmen, stimulated by rising commodity prices and the mechanization of certain trades. During this period Wisconsin labor

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 651

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.