Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

By Workers Of The Writers' Program | Go to book overview

Literature

THE bulk of Wisconsin's literature has been written by men well known in public life, who have set down comprehensive accounts of their own ideas and experiences. The memoirs, reminiscences, and formal autobiographies of these men -- politicians, artists, economists, scholars, farmers -- together make up a solid and uniform body of writing that extends from the wilderness days of 1700 down to the present. There were the diaries of the first missionaries and travelers; there was the life story of a defeated Sauk chieftain, of a Liberal and reformer during Lincoln's administration, of a frontier farmer and of frontier humorists, of a Spiritualist preacher of the 1890's, of a fighting statesman during World War years, of a modern revolutionary architect; a lumberman, a chief justice of the State supreme court, a poet-professor, a labor economist, a pioneer sociologist; each presents a fairly complete picture of the man and his field of activity. These books are the root and substance of Wisconsin's literature; even more than the writings of many professional authors they convey the day-to-day flavor, the social excitement, the ferment and activity that characterize Wisconsin life.

The French Jesuit priests, trained observers and recorders, often the first white men in regions of the Northwest, wrote detailed accounts of their own adventures and hardships and of the lives and customs of the Indians. These accounts were sent in instalments to France over a long period, from 1611 to 1768, and came to be known as The Jesuit Relations. Outstanding among the contributing priests was Father Jacques Marquette, who crossed what is now Wisconsin with Louis Jolliet. The Jesuit Relations were translated and edited ( 1896- 1901) in seventy-three volumes by Reuben Gold Thwaites. About thirty volumes deal specifically with Wisconsin.

Another priest, the Franciscan friar Louis Hennepin, is remembered for his vivid writing in A New Discovery of a Vast Country in America (accessible in a 1903 version edited by Reuben Gold Thwaites). Father Hennepin tells of a voyage that he made to Green Bay in 1679 on the ill-fated Griffon in company with Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle.

An important book touching on Wisconsin during the British regime is Jonathan Carver's Travels through the Interior Parts of NorthAmerica in the Years 1766, 1767, 1768,

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 651

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.