Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

By Workers Of The Writers' Program | Go to book overview

Painting and Sculpture

BEFORE the arrival of Europeans in the State, Indians were making brightly-colored geometric designs by sewing porcupine quills, small feathers, or crude beads on buffalo hide or buckskin. Because curves were difficult to produce with the straight porcupine quills, diamond, triangle, vertebrae, and forked patterns were very frequent. Curves were more common in beadwork, and large beads were strung together to make breast ornaments and necklaces. The Winnebagoes added conventionalized floral motifs to their geometric patterns. They also wove storage bags of fibre, nettle, and buffalo hair. There was little pictorial design, though tepee hides were sometimes decorated with paintings and drawings of angular symbolic figures of men, animals, birds, and implements of war. The combinations of primary colors -- produced from bark, plants, and soil -- in both sewed work and painting were often excellent. When the missionaries and traders of the seventeenth century brought finer beads, steel needles, cotton thread, and woven fabrics, Indian work became more varied. The women learned the arts of appliqué work, embrodiery, and knitting, which the white settlers had brought with them from Europe. Richer floral patterns and more subtle colors were used, and pictorial designs, such as horses, pipes, guns, arrows, and men, made their appearance upon beaded vests and ceremonial aprons. Indians who were converts to Christianity began to introduce the cross and pictures of churches into their designs.

A single ostensorium of sterling silver, now in the Green Bay Museum, has been preserved from the period of French settlement. It was long after the traders and missionaries had come that American artists began to appear. The inhabitants generally had little interest in art, but at the beginning of the nineteenth century eastern painters were being sent into the Territory, commissioned by the War Department to depict the dress, ceremonies, and domestic habits of the Indians and to record the topography of the area between Green Bay and Prairie du Chien. Free-lance artists were making solitary canoe trips up and down the Fox-Wisconsin River route, painting Indians in much the same spirit as Audubon painted birds.

The first painter known to have traveled in Wisconsin was Samuel Seymour ( 1797-1872), staff artist to Major S. M. Long. In 1823,

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 651

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.