Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

By Workers Of The Writers' Program | Go to book overview

Kenosha

Railroad Stations: 5410 13th Ave. for Chicago & North Western Ry.; 2703 63rd St. for Chicago, North Shore & Milwaukee R.R.; 800 55th St. for The Milwaukee Electric Ry. & Transport Co., interurban.

Bus Stations: 617 57th St. for Greyhound Lines; 800 55th St. for Chicago & North Western Stages and Wisconsin Motor Bus Lines.

Airport: Kenosha Municipal Airport, 0.6 m. S. of city limits on 22nd Ave., taxi fare 50¢; no scheduled service.

Trackless Trolleys: Fare 7¢. Taxis: Fare 25¢ single, 5¢ each additional passenger within city limits.

Traffic Regulations: No left turn off 6th Ave. in downtown area; no U turns in downtown area.

Accommodations: Three hotels; tourist homes.

Information Service: Chamber of Commerce, U. S. Nat'l. Bank Bldg., 625 57th St.

Motion Picture Houses: Six.

Athletics and Recreation: Lakefront Stadium, 58th St. and lakefront for track meets, football, city celebrations, etc.; Washington Bowl, Washington Park, 22nd Ave. and Washington Blvd. for bicycle races; Lincoln Park, 68th St. and 18th Ave., for tennis, boating, softball, football, picnicking.

Swimming: Alford, Pennoyer, Simmons' Island, and Southport Parks, Lincoln Park.

Tennis: Municipal courts at Washington, Pennoyer and Simmons' Island Parks.

Golf: Municipal course at Washington Park, 22nd Ave. and Washington Blvd., 9 holes, greens fee 15¢; Petrifying Springs Park Golf Course, 4 m. W. on State 43 then County H, 18 holes, greens fee 250 for 9 and 500 for 18 holes.

Annual Events: Annual horse show, June; Flower show, June and Sept.; Amateur Bicycle Races, during summer; Road Race Thanksgiving Day.

KENOSHA (612 alt., 50,262 pop.), a highly industrialized city in southeastern Wisconsin, lies along the shore of Lake Michigan north and south of the point where Pike's Creek enters the lake. Compact and trim, its streets running in an orderly fashion, Kenosha spreads out across the flat level of the land, broken only by the narrow, slow creek widening into a small harbor at its center. One factory stands on the harbor's edge, a long, dark building shadowing the yacht club basin, where slim sailboats and fishing dories anchor side by side. The long lakefront is a series of pleasant green parks that overlook wide waters and the passing bulk of freighters and steamers. On misty days the sound of a foghorn cuts through the air, and the smoke from tall factory smokestacks hangs low over the city.

The costly homes in deep gardens along 3rd Avenue near the lake-

-196-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 651

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.