Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

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small MUSEUM exhibiting specimens of rock, coral, and Indian relics. A short distance from the museum is a PREACHING CROSS, from which Jesuit missionaries preached to the Indians. Nearby (inquire locally) are evidences of ancient Indian habitation -- cornfields, fireplaces, and. sites of log longhouses.

At the end of the Potawatomi Trail on the island is BOWYER'S BLUFF, an imposing limestone ledge 200 feet above the water. Caves and fissures seam the cliff, and at places the erosion of water and wind have whittled grotesque formations in the rock. Topping the bluff is BOWYER'S BLUFF LIGHT TOWER.

JACKSON HARBOR, at the northeast corner of the island, is an important fishing village. All along the water front huge fishing nets are stretched to dry upon the rocks. Fishermen daily go out to their gill nets anchored 25 or 30 miles offshore. The nets are hauled by machinery into the boats, where the fish are cleaned and washed as innumerable gulls flutter about snapping up the entrails. Brought to the fish sheds at Jackson Harbor, the fish are packed for shipment.

Opposite Jackson Harbor is 1,000-acre ROCK ISLAND, which, like Washington Island, shows the contours of the Niagara escarpment. Trappers and fishermen settled Rock Island about 1835. Among the early comers was David Kennison, longest-lived member of the Boston Tea Party, who died in 1852 at the age of 116 and is buried in Lincoln Park, Chicago.

Since the Civil War, Rock Island has been virtually deserted and is now the estate of a Chicago manufacturer. At the head of its single harbor he has built a boathouse and great hall of cobblestones, roughly patterned after feudal Icelandic manors, with great beams bracing the pointed, unceilinged roof and an enormous fireplace at one end. The only other structure on Rock Island is the POTANVATOMIE LIGHTHOUSE, oldest in the State, erected in 1837 and rebuilt in 1858.


Tour 1B
Junction with State 57 -- Egg Harbor -- Ephraim -- Sister Bay; 28.1 m. State 42.

Asphalt roadbed. Resort accommodations.

State 42 runs northeast along the Green Bay shore, sometimes on top of craggy coastal cliffs, sometimes dipping down abruptly to resort and fishing villages along the shore. When lumberjacks, cut off from

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