Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

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Tour 1C
Junction with State 57 -- Kewaunee -- Two Rivers -- Manitowoc; 56.7 m. State 42.

Hard-surfaced roadbed.
Adequate accommodations.

This route links Door Peninsula, with its rocky fields, wild brush, and old villages, to the eastern lakeshore with its broad, rich farms and crowded industrial cities.

South of the junction with State 57, 0 m. (see Tour 1), State 42 crosses a swamp overgrown with cedar and spruce. Six-foot ditches, like muddy canals, border the highway and drain both swamp and roadbed. For years construction engineers dumped tons of material into this swamp, but always the roadbed sank. Finally they dynamited the muck, allowed the highway to drop to the bottom of the bog, then graded it up to its present surface. The highway angles across broad farm land, and from a hilltop at 5.8 m. overlooks a wide plain and the white houses and black rooftops of FORESTVILLE, 6.7 m. (550 pop.), sleepy and sunny market center for the surrounding farm area. South of Forestville State 42 runs along the crest of a ridge overlooking lazily undulating countryside.

ALGOMA (Ind., sandy place), 12.8 m. (590 alt., 2,202 pop.), has an L-shaped business section. On top of the lakeshore bluff on the southern side of the city is a picnic and camping ground, and at its foot a public beach. Seen from this bluff, the fields and hills surrounding Algoma taper down to a wavering yellow line of sandy beach; the breakwaters form a pattern in white against the blue background of the lake; and a bright red lighthouse darts a sliver of vivid color into the windswept landscape.

Beyond the DOOR-KEWAUNEE COUNTY NORMAL SCHOOL, 13.1 m., the highway traverses an open countryside with occasional farms and then sweeps into the marshy valley of the Kewaunee River at 23.8 m. Across the swamp (L) are the harbor and breakwater of Kewaunee's port; in the swamp rows of pilings show where railroad trestles once spanned the mile-wide flood plain.

KEWAUNEE (Ind., prairie hen), 24.7 m. (586 alt., 2,409 pop.), lies clustered around the harbor at the southern edge of the flood plain, sloping upward to the surrounding red clay banks. Though Jean Nicolet passed here in 1634, there was no settlement until 1795, when Jacques Vieau, agent for the North West Fur Company of Montreal, established a trading post here. Immigration was slow until 1836,

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