Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

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GOODS MANUFACTURING COMPANY PLANT, which covers five square blocks and employs 800 workers. In 1893, when aluminum was still a rather expensive curiosity, Joseph Koenig, a young German who had been in charge of the aluminum exhibit at the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago, came here on a visit. Hamilton, interested in the product, leased Koenig space and power in his type factory. When Koenig took his first manufactured articles to Chicago in 1895, he received orders for more goods in two hours than he could manufacture in three months. Aided by the city, which provided $2,000 toward an aluminum novelties factory, Koenig attained such success that William and Henry Vits of Manitowoc converted their tannery into a competing plant. In 1909 these two factories were merged with the New Jersey Aluminum Company and incorporated as the Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Company, a Mellon-controlled concern.

MANITOWOC, 56.7 m. (595 alt., 22,963 pop.) (see Tour 18), is at the junction with US 141 (see Tour 3), US 151 (see Tour 6), and US 10 (see Tour 18).


Tour 2
(Menominee, Mich.) -- Marinette -- Green Bay -- Oshkosh -- Fond du Lac -- Milwaukee -- (Chicago, Ill.); US 41.

Michigan Line to Illinois Line, 225.5 m.

Chicago & North Western Ry. parallels route between Marinette and Fond du Lac; Soo Line between Fond du Lac and Richfield; Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific R.R. between Milwaukee and Illinois Line. Concrete roadbed. Many camp sites and picnic grounds; good city accommodations.

Between Marinette and Oshkosh US 41 crosses territory known to three centuries of white men; it follows in part the Fox River-Lake Winnebago waterway, early route of French missionaries, explorers, traders, and soldiers. South of Fond du Lac the highway winds through the kettle moraine country and out into flat lakeshore farmlands settled in the 1830's by farmers from the East.


Section a. Marinette to GREEN BAY; 55.1 m., US 41

US 41 crosses the INTERSTATE BRIDGE spanning the Menominee River, the boundary between Wisconsin and Michigan, from Menominee, Michigan.

Marinette, 0 m. (600 alt., 13,734 pop.), on the Green Bay

-320-

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