Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

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RACINE, 26.1 m. (629 alt., 67,542 pop.) (see Racine).

Racine is at the junction with State 11 (see Tour 24).

Southward State 42 runs close to the Lake Michigan shore; here, again the terracing caused by the receding waters of the ancient glacial lake appear (R) on the higher ground several miles distant. The Pike River, cutting through the soft soil at 34.6 m., has formed a small ravine,, the site of the ghost village of Pike River, settled in 1835. The village passed out of existence when its few settlers packed their belongings and moved to the larger lakeshore communities in 1842.

South of Pike River, State 42 continues down the valley between small bluffs and passes (R) a GROVE (picnic tables and fireplaces), 354 m. At 36.4 m. the highway, now a city street in Kenosha, is called Sheridan Road, a name it bears between this point and Chicago.

KENOSHA, 37.4 m. (612 alt., 50,262 pop.) (see Kenosha).

State 42 crosses the Illinois Line, 43.9 m., 49 miles north of Chicago, Illinois.


Tour 4
Crandon -- Shawano -- Kaukauna -- Fond du Lac; 159.1 m. State 55.

Dustless and concrete roadbed.
Adequate accommodations.

State 55 twists southward through an almost unpeopled country, the cutover wasteland of northern Wisconsin and the heavy forest of the Menominee Indian Reservation. Farther south there is a slow transition; gradually the wilderness recedes and farms and pastures appear. In its southern section State 55 traverses a rich land devoted to farming and grazing.


Section a. CRANDON to SHAW ANO; 70.4 m., State 55

CRANDON, 0 m. (1,635 alt., 1,679 pop.) (see Tour 16), is at the junction with US 8 (see Tour 16). State 55 skirts the northern end of LAKE METONCA, then swings southward at 0.8 m. into a rough and stony country where high boulder-strewn uplands sink suddenly to swamps and ponds. In the low forest of popple, birch, and balsam along the roadside, wild animals occasionally are seen: a deer or rabbit moving swiftly through the brush, porcupines dozing in the forks of higher trees, more rarely a black bear nosing clumsily through the cutover. Farming on this land is spare and unproductive. In some

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