Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

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Government and agreed to move to a new reservation across the Mississippi. On the unsold half the village of Stockbridge was platted, and here the Government unsuccessfully attempted to settle those Indians who desired to become United States citizens. When dissension arose, the tribe was reunited and tribal government restored. In 1856 the Stockbridge, after negotiating a final treaty with the Federal Government, relinquished all rights to their land here in return for a cash settlement and a new reservation adjoining the Menominee Indian Reservation (see above), where their descendants still live (see Tour 17).

South of Stockbridge, State 55 runs along the escarpment face. Below, the broad countryside is squared into fields, dotted with big barns and houses, intersected by thin files of trees. From the higher points almost all of Lake Winnebago is visible on clear days.

At 70.4 m. is the junction with US 151 (see Tour 6); between this junction and Fond du Lac State 55 and US 151 are one route (see Tour 6).

FOND DU LAC, 88.7 m. (759 alt., 26,449 pop.) (see Tour 5), is at the junction with US 41 (see Tour 2), US 45 (see Tour 5), State 23 (see Tour 5,4), and US 151 (see Tour 6).


Tour 4 A Keshena -- Neopit -- Junction with US 45; 30.3 m. State 47.

Hard-surfaced roadbed.

State 47 travels a narrow path westward through the wooded wilderness of the Menominee Indian Reservation. More than 2,300 Indians live and work in the forest but are seen only occasionally following trails among the trees or driving truckloads of logs to their sawmill at Neopit.

KESHENA (Ind., swift-flying), 0 m. (see Tour 4), is at the junction with State 55 (see Tour 4). State 47 crosses the Wolf River, 0.3 m., just below Keshena Falls, where Chief Reginald Oshkosh operated a trading post for both Indians and whites. At 1.7 m. is the frame of a ceremonial lodge, which is covered with skins and blankets when used for traditional Menominee dances.

At 8.4 m. is the junction with a dirt road (impassable for cars when wet).

Right on this rough and tortuous road to PEAVEY FALLS (adm. 250 per car), 0.6 m., on the West Branch of the Wolf River, which spills over a red

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