Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

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At 67.9 m. is the junction with US 51 (see Tour 7); between this junction and 69.6 m. US. 151 and US 51 are one route. US 151 enters Madison by way of E. Washington Ave.

MADISON, 73 m. (859 alt., 57,899 pop.) (see Madison).

Madison is at the junction with US 12 (see Tour 19), State 113 (see Tour 19B), US 14 (see Tour 20), US 18 (see Tour 23), and State 30 (see Tour 23A).


Tour 7
(Ironwood, Mich.) -- Hurley -- Wausau -- Madison -- Beloit -- Rockford, Ill.); US 51. Michigan Line to Illinois Line, 341.2 m.

Chicago & North Western Ry. parallels route between Hurley and Woodruff, and between Madison and Beloit; Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific R.R. between Woodruff and Stevens Point, and between Madison and Beloit; Soo Line between Stevens Point and Madison. Hard-surfaced and oiled-gravel roadbed. Good hotels and restaurants provide adequate facilities throughout entire route; many camps, resorts, lodges, and cabins in northern lakes region.

From the mine-scarred cutover of the far north US 51 winds southward the length of Wisconsin, revealing along its route the aspects of a State so diverse that wolves are still hunted in one section while tractors and X-ray tubes are manufactured in another. Much of the north is a cutover wilderness in which people depend upon seasonal tourist trade for income; the timber is gone, farming has failed. To the south the scene gradually changes; rich, intensively cultivated fields succeed the unproductive cutover; tidy farmsteads, the log huts; and highly industrialized cities, the lean farm villages, as the highway approaches the Illinois Line.


Section a. MICHIGAN LINE to WAUSAU; 130.1 m., US 51

South of the junction with US 2 (see Tour 14), 0 m., US 51 follows the Montreal River, the boundary between Michigan and Wisconsin, toward Hurley which sprawls on the hillside (R).

HURLEY, 1.5 m. (1,493 alt., 3,264 pop.), only a few thin blocks along the riverbank, fans out and up the valley, a scattering of white cottages and bungalows, yellow brick buildings, and gaunt frame houses joined by a bridge with Ironwood, Michigan, her much larger sister city

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