Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

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Farms become more numerous west of the Amnicon River, many of them with berry patches near the highway. Strawberries grow here in mats of interlaced vines; their white, yellow-centered blossoms star the fields briefly in spring; red berries peep from under the green leaves in late summer. The raspberries cultivated here have much the tang of the wild varieties that grow in the surrounding cutover. Some farmers receive a gross income of $300 to $400 an acre from their berry patches. Numerous apple orchards appear at the roadside, for here is one of the principal apple-growing districts of the State.

At 90.3 m. is the junction with US 53 (see Tour 10); between this junction and the Minnesota Line, US 2 and US 53 are one route (see Tour 10). At 96 m. is the junction with State 13 (see Tour 14A).

SUPERIOR, 104.2 m. (629 alt., 36,113 pop.) (see Superior).

Superior is at the junction with US 53 (see Tour 10), State 35 (see Tour 13), and State 13 (see Tour 14A). US 2 reaches the ARROWHEAD BRIDGE (toll: 5¢ each passenger; 10¢ for auto; 25¢ team and wagon or small truck; 35¢ large truck) at the Minnesota Line, 106.3 m.


Tour 14A
Ashland -- Bayfield -- Superior, 107.9 m.; State 13.

Oiled-gravel or asphalt roadbed.

Accommodations adequate. Good hotel and restaurant facilities at Bayfield and Washburn.

State 13, alternate route between Ashland and Superior, is almost 40 miles longer than US 2. Curving along the rocky shores of Lake Superior, it passes storm-beaten fishing villages, touches the Red Cliff Indian Reservation, and provides access to the Apostle Islands with their wave-carved cliffs and arches.

ASHLAND, 0 m. (666 alt., 10,622 pop.) (see Tour 8), is at the junction with US 2 (see Tour 14), US 63 (see Tour 9), and lower State 13 (see Tour 8). Passing grimy coal docks and the steam plant of the Lake Superior District Power Company, the highway rounds the head of Chequamegon Bay and ascends the steep ridge along its western shore.

WASHBURN, 11 m. (656 alt., 2,238 pop.), seat of Bayfield County, rises in tiers on the slope of a bluff. Many of its buildings, notably the courthouse, are constructed of reddish-brown stone quarried on Basswood Island (see below). Until 1883 not a tree had been cut

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