Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

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Tour 20
( Chicago, Ill.) -- Madison -- Richland Center -- La Crosse -- (La Crescent, Minn.); US 14.

Illinois Line to Minnesota Line, 206.1 m.

Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific R. R. parallels route between Illinois Line and Janesville and between Madison and Richland Center; Chicago & North Western Ry. between Janesville and Madison. Hard-surfaced roadbed. Accommodations limited in villages.

US 14, marking off a triangular corner of Wisconsin, crosses the fertile, long-cultivated lowlands of the south, the sandy corn lands of the Wisconsin River Valley, and the rough country of the rocky Western Upland to the Mississippi River terrace. Along the way are Madison, lake-surrounded, tree-framed capital of the State; Tower Hill State Park, rich in historical associations; Taliesin, home of Frank Lloyd Wright and his architects' fellowship; and, finally, the great hills and dark valleys of the half-wild coulee country.


Section a. ILLINOIS LINE to MADISON, 68.8 m., US 14

US 14 crosses the ILLINOIS LINE, 0 m., 68 miles north of Chicago, into WALWORTH, 2 m. (1,004 alt., 920 pop.), built around a shady square with a green slatted bandstand. Streets lead past small residences into open fields. An aged frame hotel fronts the square; nailed to one of the veranda posts is a sign announcing "A lawyer will be here on Thursdays."

US 14 swings northwestward through a gently rolling country, which has long been farmed. Buildings all about are shabby and rundown, attesting years of depression. In the villages sale notices are common:

"Having sold our farm we will sell at Public Auction on the late P. D. Smith Farm located on the SW 1/4 section of 25 township of Darien 2 miles E of the overhead bridge on highway 15 to E. of Little Stream where County Road turns North one quarter mile from the third sideroad. There will be lunch served on the grounds. 20 Holsteins all young, and most of them are springing. A good dairy, all of them being home raised. 7 good horses.

-505-

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