Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

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this junction and a point at 98 m. State 60 and US 18 are one route. West of the junction the highway swings diagonally across the fanshaped prairie on which Prairie du Chien lies. Ahead is the level hazy line of the Mississippi bluffs, with steep, tree-covered Sentinel Ridge (L).

PRAIRIE DU CHIEN, 98 m. (643 alt., 3,943 pop.) (see Tour 13), is at the junction with State 35 (see Tour 13) and State 60 (see Tour 22). US 18 crosses the Iowa Line, 98.7 m., on the INTERSTATE TOLL BRIDGE (70¢ for car and driver one way, $.1.15 round trip; 10¢ each way for each additional passenger), one mile east of Marquette, Iowa.


Tour 23A
Junction with US 18 to Madison; 67.6 m., State 30.

Oiled-gravel and low-type bituminous roadbed. Small village accommodations.

State 30 connects Milwaukee and Madison, providing an alternate route to US 18 (see Tour 23). The distance of the two routes is almost equal, but State 30 is narrower, less traveled, and not so well surfaced. Because of light traffic, it has been chosen as a Youth Hostel route, and now, in addition to being a thoroughfare for milk trucks rolling up and down its low hills in early morning, State 30 is a line of "safeguarded adventure" for hikers, cyclists, and horseback riders. Their overnight destination may be any one of the pleasant farmhouses along the way.

Branching right from US 18 (see Tour 23) at GOERKES CORNERS, 0 m., State 30 leaves the noisy traffic of outer Milwaukee and enters peaceful moraine country, where the land surface is humped strangely in mounds and ridges, or sunken in duck ponds and grassy craters. For all its roughness, it is intensively cultivated, largely by truck gardeners, who haul their fresh lettuce and other vegetables to Goerkes Corners and Milwaukee.

DELAFIELD, 10.9 m., with its white frame and yellow brick buildings, lies in the shade of old trees; at times from surrounding swamps and lakes can be heard the cries of marsh birds. The HOMESTEAD HOTEI, a frame building painted white and brown, with old ornate woodwork, was for years a stopping place for coaches on the old Milwaukee-Madison stage route.

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