Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

By Workers Of The Writers' Program | Go to book overview

foundry, tank shop, woodworking shop, and sheet metal shop where stainless steel is formed, welded and polished.

After curving around Rock Lake, State 30 abruptly runs into higher and more steeply pitched countryside. Long red tobacco sheds begin to appear high on the hills, and many farms have cloth-covered hothouses. Then the highway slopes down again to marshland and peat flats.

At 62.4 m. is the junction with US 51 (see Tour 7); between this junction and a point at 63.3 m., State 30 and US 51 are one route.

State 30 continues into the city to the junction of Park St. and University Ave.

MADISON, 67.6 m. (859 alt., 57,899 pop.) (see Madison).

Madison is at the junction with US 151 (see Tour 6), US 12 (see Tour 19), State 113 (see Tour 19B), US 14 (see Tour 20), and US 18 (see Tour 23).


Tour 23B
Verona -- New Glarus -- Monroe -- (Orangeville, Ill.); State 69.

Verona to Illinois Line, 43.3 m.

Hard-surfaced roadbed. Accommodations limited except at Monroe.

State 69 leads southward through the pleasant hills and valleys of the Wisconsin Swiss settlements. For some distance the Little Sugar River parallels the highway, its tiny tributaries threading through hummocky pastures on which Holstein and Brown Swiss cattle graze against a background of model farmsteads.

In VERONA, 0 m. (983 alt., 455 pop.), are small stores and pleasant shaded houses; behind the main street buildings rises (R) the white frame Auditorium Hotel, the Saturday-night meeting place for townsmen and farmers. Verona is at the junction with US 18 (see Tour 23).

State 69 cuts through a low ridge of bright pink and yellow sandstone, 4.5 m., then circles among low hills and woodlots covered with brush to BELLEVILLE (Fr., beautiful city), 10.1 m. (864 alt., 564 pop.). The village, lying on the Sugar River in the center of an oval plain, was named by an early settler, John Frederick, for his old home in Canada.

At 13.4 m. the highway descends the side of a ravine dark with massive rocks and wild-growth tangles. At 17.7 m. is a TOURIST CAMPGROUND.

-546-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 651

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.