Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

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in Green County alone, and almost all of the product from the southwestern Wisconsin cheese area went to market by way of Monroe. Cheese became less offensive when money as well as odors from the new industry began to pour into the city.

In 1914 a Cheese Day was inaugurated with the enthusiastic support of the city. The seventh cheese festival, held in 1935, attracted 50,000 people to watch an elaborate parade climaxed by the crowning of a cheese queen and to feast on eight tons of Swiss and Limburger cheese. In the same year cheese was stoutly defended when Monroe's postmaster engaged in a sniffing duel with a postmaster in Iowa to determine whether or not the odor of Limburger in transit was a fragrance or a stench. Well publicized by the press of the Nation, the duel ended when a decision was reached which held that Limburger merely exercised its constitutional right to hold its own against all comers.

Saturday afternoons in Monroe find the townspeople evincing great interest in the display of new cheese-making implements in the windows of hardware stores, mingling with the cheese makers and their assistants, who often walk slowly on stiff and aching legs made rheumatic by the water and steam of the factories.

Organized gymnastic groups meet regularly in a $35,000 TURNER HALL, one block south of the square, which replaced the old hall destroyed by fire in 1936. Typical Swiss dances are held here on occasion, and yodeling societies frequently fill the hall with throaty performances.

The alternate and main route of State 69 rejoin at 35.6 m.

State 69 crosses the Illinois Line, 43.3 m., 4 miles north of Orangeville, Ill.


Tour 24
Racine -- Burlington -- Janesville -- Monroe -- Illinois Line; 165 m., State 11.

Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific R. R. parallels route between Racine and Shullsburg. Hard-surfaced and oiled-gravel roadbed. Adequate accommodations at Racine, Janesville, Monroe, and the resort region near Elkhorn and Delavan.

State 11 links two early settled regions in Wisconsin -- the metropolitan Lake Michigan area and the southwestern mining country. Separated by distance and dissimilar in ideals, the two were political and economic rivals during Territorial days. At first the older south-

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