Wisconsin: A Guide to the Badger State

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Chronology
FRENCH DOMINION
1634 Jean Nicolet, emissary of New France, lands on shores of Green Bay.
1654-56 Médard Chouart, Sieur de Groseilliers, fur trader, with companion of uncertain identity, winters among Potawatomi around Green Bay; following spring ascends Fox River; crosses at Portage.
1656-57 Groseilliers, with his brother-in-law, Pierre Esprit Radisson, visits Green Bay; proceeds south -- route uncertain.
1658-60 Same two explorers skirt south shore of Lake Superior; some­0where between Ashland and Washburn build rude waterside hut­0probably first white habitation in Wisconsin. Visit Ottawa on Lac Court Oreilles; accompany Sioux to site of city of Superior and into eastern Minnesota. Returning, build post of Chequamegon Bay; return to Montreal.
1660-61 Father René Ménard follows Hurons into Wisconsin; winters at Keweenaw Bay; starts to visit Hurons of Chippewa and Black Rivers; lost in dense forest along tributary of Chippewa River; is never heard from again.
1665-67 Father Claude Jean Allouez, Jesuit missionary, reopens Huron mission on shore of Chequamegon Bay.
1668-70 Nicolas Perrot, fur trader, visits Winnebago, Potawatomi, Fox, Sauk, and Mascouten villages near Green Bay; gains Potawatomi trade for New France.
1669 Father Jacques Marquette relieves Father Allouez who goes to Green Bay.
1670 May 20. Father Allouez returns to Sault Ste Marie after visiting Fox village on Wolf River and Mascouten village on upper Fox (near present Berlin). In autumn, he and Father Claude Dablon begin three missions; St. François, for Menominee and Potawatomi; St. Marc for Fox; and St. Jacques for Mascouten.
1671 Simon François Daumont, Sieur de St. Lusson, at Sault Ste Marie, takes official possession of Northwest in name of French King.
1672 Fathers Allouez and André build St. François Xavier mission at De Pere, center of Jesuit missionary work.
1673 May, Louis Joliet and Father Jacques Marquette leave Mackinac; enter Green Bay and Fox River; reach Mascouten village on June 7; portage into Wisconsin River. June 17 they discover Mississippi River.

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