A Catalogue of Books, Manuscripts, and Other Materials from the Upton Sinclair Archives

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XIII. EDITOR
227. Letter: From Louis Untermeyer. 4 January 1915.

Untermeyer, who had just read the manuscript of A Cry for Justice, called it "one of the greatest anthologies ever attempted" and believed that "it should rank with the very noblest works of all time."

One sheet (folded) (9⅜ × 6⅛). Autograph.

228. The Cry for Justice: An Anthology of the Literature of Social Protest. The writings of philosophers, poets, novelists, social reformers, and others who have voiced the struggle against social injustice. Selected from twenty-five languages covering a period of five thousand years. Edited by Upton Sinclair. With an introduction by Jack London. Illustrated with reproductions of social protest in art. The John C. Winston Company: Philadelphia, 1915.

Bound in limp black morocco. All edges stained red.

The John C. Winston Company was at this time one of the foremost publishers of Bibles. When it published this "Socialists' Bible," a small number were issued with this distinctively "Bible" binding and edge treatment.

229. Upton Sinclair's: A Monthly Magazine.

A bound volume of this monthly magazine subtitled "For a Clean Peace and the Internation," which ran from April, 1918, through February, 1919. (May- June combined; irregular supplements.)

Bound in green fabrikoid.

230. Letter: From E. F. Stanton. 19 July 1918.

A sympathetic reaction to Upton Sinclair's.

"Today, in my watermelon patch, I found a copy of your interesting magazine. . . . How it got there I do not know. An angel may have dropped it where he knew I would find it."

Six sheets (12¼ × 7¾). Autograph.

231. Hellaloo Pete o'Reno. By Jim Seymour. With an introduction by Upton Sinclair. Upton Sinclair: Pasadena, ( 1919].

In printed wrappers.

An example of Mr. Sinclair's constant interest in helping promising writers --particularly those from the working class.

232. Debs and the Poets. Edited by Ruth Le Prade. With an introduction by Upton Sinclair. Published by Upton Sinclair: Pasadena, [ 1920].

Slip on back paste-down flyleaf reads:

This is a special edition of five hundred autographed copies, of which the present copy is number 88. This edition was prepared in order that lovers and friends of Eugene V. Debs might assist in advertising the book, and thus furthering the cause of amnesty for political prisoners. By permission of the warden, the book was sent

-40-

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A Catalogue of Books, Manuscripts, and Other Materials from the Upton Sinclair Archives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Contents 3
  • Introduction 4
  • I. Ancestors 11
  • Iv. the Struggling Artist 12
  • V. the Jungle 14
  • Vi. "Causes" 15
  • Vii. Playwright 24
  • Viii. the "Dead Hand" 27
  • Ix. Oil! 28
  • X. Boston 33
  • Xi. the Epic Campaign 34
  • Xiii. Editor 40
  • Xv. Some Critics 41
  • Xvi. Trophies and Tributes 43
  • Xvii. a Gallery of Portraits 44
  • Xviii. Posters 46
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