Ideas and Integrities: A Spontaneous Autobiographical Disclosure

By Buckminster Fuller; W. Marks | Go to book overview

chapter 7
The Cumulative Nature of Wealth

WEALTH. The measurable degree of forwardly organized environmental control, in terms of quickly convertible energy, capacities and performance ratioed system capabilities per capita, per diem.

Wealth is now without practical limit. All the constituents of wealth are now demonstrably inexhaustible and are all on inventory to man's immediate willing. Science has hooked up the everyday economic plumbing to the cosmic reservoir.

You can now have your cake and eat it. The more you eat, the more and the better the quality of the cakes to be had by further production.

Science continually does more with less each time it obsoletes and scraps old inventions. Scrap is resolved to some part of the inventory of the ninety-two regenerative chemical elements. Interim improvement in technical measurement of performance makes possible an ever higher magnitude of new performance by reuse of the same quantity of the original inventory of the chemical elements. Telephone messages per given cross section of copper wire increased from one to several conversations at the same time, then to scores, then to hundreds of messages taking place concurrently. So rapid is the rate of gain of telephone technology per given amount of copper that the telephone company has an

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