The Spirit of Laws; A Discourse on the Origin of Inequality; A Discourse on Political Economy; The Social Contract

By Charles de Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu; Jean Jacques Rousseau | Go to book overview

CONTENTS: The Spirit of Laws
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE, PAGEix
Prefacexxi
Advertisementxxii

Book I. Of Laws in General
1. Of the Relation of Laws to Different Beings1
2. Of the Laws of Nature2
3. Of Positive Laws2

Book II. Of Laws Directly Derived from the Nature of Government
1. Of the Nature of the Three Different Governments4
2. Of the Republican Government, and the Laws in Relation to Democracy4
3. Of the Laws in Relation to the Nature of Aristocracy6
4. Of the Relation of Laws to the Nature of Monarchical Government7
5. Of the Laws in Relation to the Nature of a Despotic Government8

Book III. Of the Principles of the Three Kinds of Government
1. Difference Between the Nature and Principle of Government9
2. Of the Principle of Different Governments9
3. Of the Principle of Democracy9
4. Of the Principle of Aristocracy10
5. That Virtue Is Not the Principle of a Monarchical Government11
6. In What Manner Virtue Is Supplied in a Monarchical Government11
7. Of the Principle of Monarchy11
8. That Honour Is Not the Principle of Despotic Government12
9. Of the Principle of Despotic Government12
10. Difference of Obedience in Moderate and Despotic Governments12
11. Reflections on the Preceding Chapters13

Book IV. That the Laws of Education Ought to Be in Relation to the Principles of Government
1. Of the Laws of Education13
2. Of Education in Monarchies13
3. Of Education in a Despotic Government15
4. Difference between the Effects of Ancient and Modern Education15
5. Of Education in a Republican Government15
6. Of some Institutions among the Greeks16
7. In What Cases These Singular Institutions May Be of Service17
8. Explanation of a Paradox of the Ancients in Respect to Manners17

Book V. That the Laws Given by the Legislator Ought to Be in Relation to the Principle of Government
1. Idea of This Book18
2. What Is Meant by Virtue in a Political State18
3. What Is Meant by a Love of the Republic in a Democracy19
4. In What Manner the Love of Equality and Frugality Is Inspired19
5. In What Manner the Laws Establish Equality in a Democracy19
6. In What Manner the Laws Ought to Maintain Frugality in a Democracy21
7. Other Methods of Favouring the Principle of Democracy21
8. In What Manner the Laws Should Relate to the Principle of Government in an Aristocracy23
9. In What Manner the Laws Are in Relation to Their Principle in Monarchies25
10. Of the Expedition Peculiar to the Executive Power in Monarchies25
11. Of the Excellence of a Monarchical Government25
12. The Same Subject Continued26
13. An Idea of Despotic Power26
14. In What Manner the Laws Are in Relation to the Principles of Despotic Government26
15. The Same Subject Continued29
16. Of the Communication of Power30
17. Of Presents30
18. Of Rewards Conferred by the Sovereign31
19. New Consequences of the Principles of the Three Governments31

Book VI. Consequences of the Principles of Different Governments with Respect to the Simplicity of Civil and Criminal Laws, the Form of Judgments, and the Inflicting of Punishments
1. Of the Simplicity of Civil Laws in Different Governments33
2. Of the Simplicity of Criminal Laws in Different Governments34
3. In What Governments and in What Cases the Judges Ought to Determine According to the Express Letter of the Law34
4. Of the Manner of Passing Judgment35

-xi-

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The Spirit of Laws; A Discourse on the Origin of Inequality; A Discourse on Political Economy; The Social Contract
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