Diversity and Affirmative Action in Public Service

By Walter D. Broadnax | Go to book overview
It is recommended that the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA) take the initiative to assist black colleges and universities in the design and redesign of public affairs programs.

With the number of black elected officials in the United States having more than doubled in the last four years from 1,185 in 1969 to 2,621 in April 1973, 80 there is developing a "corresponding increase in the demand for professionally trained minority group members at all levels of municipal government." 81 Located in urban and rural sectors from which many of the black elected officials derive their support, the movement of black colleges into public affairs, planning, and administration education seems more than adequately justified and supportable. If that trend continues augmented by the realization in responsible local governments that there is need for minority perspectives and racial balance in municipal governmental decision making, the demand for skilled and experienced minority participation will become increasingly more crucial.

This is particularly significant because in recent years will over 70 percent of all black college graduates receiving undergraduate degrees did so from historically black colleges and universities. If there is any truth to the thought that minorities entering undergraduate or graduate programs in public affairs and administration come with inadequate skill bases with which to handle course offerings, then that issue presently demands to be faced squarely as it receives policy consideration by NASPAA.

7. It is further recommended that existing Conferences of Minority Public Administrators (COMPAS) in conjunction with local ASPA chapters urge their membership to actively support.
A. ASPA-sponsored seminars and regular local meetings on black college campuses,
B. student ASPA chapters on black college campuses,
C. recruitment of ASPA members from black college campuses,
D. identification of related professional and special interest organizations as part of the on-going planning, implementation, and evaluation process,
E. exploration of state and local officials taking the initiative in involving more educational institutions, both black and white, in local community decision making, and
F. utilization of ASPA members on both a full- and part-time basis to expand public affairs programs at black colleges and universities.

Conclusion

Black colleges and universities, in seeing themselves as resources, are intent on becoming forums which bring together community people, who are both fearful

-236-

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