Diversity and Affirmative Action in Public Service

By Walter D. Broadnax | Go to book overview

Reeves, Nancy, Womankind: Beyond the Stereotypes ( Chicago: Aldine-Atherton, 1971).

Riegel, Robert E., American Women: A Story of Social Change ( Cranbury, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1970).

Roberts, Joan I. (ed.), Beyond Intellectual Sexism: A New Woman, A New Reality ( New York: David McKay Co., 1976).

Rossi, Alice S., and Ann Calderwood (eds.), Academic Women on the Move ( New York: Russell Sage, 1973).

Samuels, Catherine, The Forgotten Five Million: Women in Public Employment ( New York: Women's Action Alliance Inc., 1975).

Sargent, Alice G. (ed.), Beyond Sex Roles ( St. Paul, Minn.: West Publishing Co., 1975).

Schneir, Miriam (ed.), Feminism: The Essential Historical Writings ( New York: Vintage, 1972).

Scott, Ann Firor (ed.), The American Woman: Who Was She? ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1971).

_____, and Andrew M. Scott, One Half the People: The Fight for Woman Suffrage ( Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Co., 1975).

Sochen, June (ed.), The New Feminism in Twentieth-Century America: ( Lexington, Mass.: D.C. Heath, 1971).

Sullerot, Evelyn, Women, Society and Change ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1971).

Tanner, Leslie B. (ed.), Voices from Women's Liberation ( New York: New American Library, 1970).

Theodore, Athena, "The Professional Woman: Trends and Prospects," in The Professional Woman, Athena Theodore (ed.), ( Cambridge, Mass.: Schenkman, 1971), pp. 1-35.


The Women's Movement in ASPA

The establishment in 1971 of the ASPA Task Force on Women in Public Administration took place during the period when task forces or committees for women were bursting forth in a wide range of professional organizations. Its activities and progress exemplified efforts made by many professional associations to address the serious issues that existed in relation to women in the respective professions. These developments must also be viewed within the context of the Women's Movement which had arisen in all sectors of society and the economy.


Legal Precursors

Looking back, one finds the first organized beginning of the current Women's Liberation Movement in the Women's Suffrage Movement. The Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 is considered a first milestone in organization in the United States. The purpose of the Women's Suffrage Movement, to gain for women the right to vote, was achieved 72 years later with the passage of the 19th Amendment

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