The Schools We Deserve: Reflections on the Educational Crises of Our Times

By Diane Ravitch | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction
1.
James P. Smith, "Race and Human Capital" ( Santa Monica, Calif.: The Rand Corporation, 1984), p. 31.
2.
John Dewey, Freedom and Culture ( New York: Putnam, 1939), p. 42.
3.
Diane Ravitch, The Troubled Crusade: American Education 1945-1980 ( New York: Basic Books, 1983).
4.
Diane Ravitch, "Programs, Placebos, Panaceas", The Urban Review, April 1968, pp. 8-11.
5.
Robert M. Hutchins, "The Democratic Dilemma," Freedom, Education, and the Fund: Essays and Addresses, 1945-1956 ( New York: Meridan Books, 1956).

Chapter 8: From History to Social Studies:
Dilemmas and Problems
1.
National Center for Education Statistics. Bulletin 83-223, "How Well Do High School Graduates of Today Meet the Curriculum Standards of the National Commission on Excellence?" ( Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, September 1983).
2.
Richard S. Kirkendall, "The Status of History in the Schools", The Journal of American History 62 ( 1975), pp. 557-570.
3.
Telephone conversation, Office of Social Studies Director, New York City Board of Education, June 1984.
4.
Bob L. Taylor and John D. Haas, New Directions: Social Studies Curriculum for the 70's ( Boulder, Co.: Center for Education in the Social Sciences, University of Colorado, and Social Science Education Consortium, 1973).
5.
Richard E. Gross, "The Status of the Social Studies in the Public Schools of the United States: Facts and Impressions of a National Survey", Social Education 41 ( March 1977), pp. 194-200, 205. See also, Hazel Whitman Hertzberg, Social Studies Reform, 1886-1980 ( Boulder, Colo.: SSEC. 1981.).
6.
Kirkendall, "The Status of History in the Schools". pp. 563-564.
7.
Edward A. Krug, The Shaping of the American High School, 1880-1920 ( New York: Harper & Row, 1964), pp.4, 29; Rolla M. Tryon, The Social Sciences as School Subjects ( New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1935), pp. 100-117.
8.
Tryon, Social Sciences as School Subjects, p. 142.
9.
National Education Association, Report of the Committee on Secondary School Studies ( Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1893) hereafter cited as Committee of Ten Report.
10.
Committee of Ten Report, p. 168.

-317-

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