The Rise of the Social Gospel in American Protestantism, 1865-1915

By Charles Howard Hopkins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
CHRISTIAN SOCIALISM

The Dawn stands for Christian Socialism. By this we mean the spirit of the Socialism of the New Testament and of the New Testament church. In man's relations to God, Jesus Christ preached an individual gospel; accordingly, in their relations to God, Christ's disciples must be individualists. In man's relations to man, Jesus Christ preached a social gospel; accordingly, in these relations, his disciples must be socialists.

The Dawn

ONE of the outstanding facts distinguishing the 1890's from the previous decade of social-gospel development was a marked change in attitude toward socialism. Unanimously rejected in the 'eighties, socialism nevertheless served as a powerful stimulus to the socializing of Christianity. In the last years of the century, however, its aims and program were examined with distinctly less hostility, much good was found in them, and an appreciable number of clergymen embraced a Christianized version of socialism as the ideal formulation of the religious social goal. This phenomenon was an integral part of the strivings of an age believing in evolution, in an organic society and in social salvation, and that was coming to appreciate the significance of environment and the power of organization.

Although Jesse Henry Jones had declared in 1875 that Christ's kingdom possessed two "wings" -- individual regeneration and social reorganization -- nearly two decades passed before this view reappeared in a refined form that reflected a better understanding of social forces. Individual regeneration alone is not enough, wrote the Reverend C. M. Morse in the Methodist Review in 1891: to be socially effective conversion must be to an ethical, socialized religion. The participation of Christians in war, slavery, and sharp business practices is evidence enough that faith in Jesus alone will not change society. If every individual in the United States were "regenerated" in an hour, asserted Morse, not a single reform in the industrial

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise of the Social Gospel in American Protestantism, 1865-1915
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.