The Rise of the Social Gospel in American Protestantism, 1865-1915

By Charles Howard Hopkins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
THE DISCOVERY OF THE SOCIAL
TEACHINGS OF JESUS

The new civilization, with its social problems, has led us to search for the social teachings of Jesus, which had been long neglected; and we find that those teachings fit modern conditions as a key fits its lock.

JOSIAH STRONG

THE confluence of several currents that resulted in the discovery of the social teachings of Jesus around the turn of the century provided the maturing social gospel with a permanently valid scriptural and authoritarian basis. Although a few pioneer social Christians -- notably Professor Stuckenberg1 had pointed out the necessity of basing a "Christian sociology" upon Christ's teachings, the ideal of the kingdom nevertheless continued to be the accepted religious foundation of the social goal until about 1900. During the early years of the new century American theology's debt to Darwin remained an open account and the "ruling ideas" of the 1890's -- the immanence of God, the solidarity of society, and the earthly presence of the kingdom -- were assumed as corollaries to the doctrine of progress. However, in the latter years of the 'nineties continental New Testament scholarship, mediated through British scholars and a few Americans who had studied in Germany, began to make itself felt in the United States. This discovery of the Jesus of history furnished the growing social-gospel movement with ethical and religious formulae according to which it eagerly constructed for itself a rationalistic and autonomous foundation that not only rested the kingdom hope upon the ethics of Jesus but afforded a frame of reference within which either a theistic or a humanistic social creed might be phrased. With

____________________
1
J. H. W. Stuckenberg, Christian Sociology ( New York, 1880), chap. iii. See also John Bascom, The Words of Christ as Principles of Personal and Social Growth ( New York and London, 1884), p. 153 and chaps. viii, ix. Austin Bierbower , Socialism of Christ ( Chicago, 1890). Minot J. Savage, Jeous and Modern Life ( Boston, 1893), chapter on the kingdom of God.

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise of the Social Gospel in American Protestantism, 1865-1915
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.