Pope John Paul II and the Church

By Peter Hebblethwaite | Go to book overview

9
John Paul's 'renewal' engulfs 'aggiornamento'

( November 16, 1979) A summit meeting of cardinals -- an unprecedented event in modern times except on the death of a pope -- took place Nov. 5-9. For juridical reasons, it was not called a "consistory." Instead it was simply known as a "meeting" or a "plenary assembly," and its rules were devised ad hoc. But it took the form of the pre-conclave congregations of last year: reports followed by questions and discussions.

Life was imitating literature, once again. In Morris West The Shoes of the Fisherman, the Russian-born Pope Kiril summons the cardinals to Rome to assess his first year as pope. That is not quite what happened, and Vaticanologists who wrote that "the pope is submitting himself to the judgment of his electors" were wide of the mark.

John Paul II put it rather differently. "You elected me," he said in effect, "and now you have the task of sustaining me. You wanted a pastor and a bishop, and I have done my best to be that, and now you must help me with the administration."

But it all started rather badly on the evening of Nov. 5. There was the touch of farce which seems inseparable from Roman events. All day long it had been said that the pope's inaugural speech would not be released to the press. A strictly selected pool of 12 journalists was allowed into the synod hall at 5 p.m. to observe their eminences arrive, recite the adsumus, and then sit down. At that point the reporters departed.

By 8 o'clock that same evening the pope's speech was available, but only to the zealous who were still on the phone. The next day, a Vatican spokesman explained what had happened: "It was never intended to make the pope's speech available, but when the cardinals heard it, they urged the pope to publish it for the good of the church." I put this remark to the four French cardinals on Wednesday, and it was evidently the first they had heard of it. They just about managed to keep straight faces.

An Asian cardinal told me: "Those of us from the Third World find the secrecy very difficult. What can we say when our people at

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pope John Paul II and the Church
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.