Pope John Paul II and the Church

By Peter Hebblethwaite | Go to book overview

The conclusion is rather bleak. It seems unlikely that the next pope was present at the Synod for Africa. But 32 or a quarter of his electors were. That thought is even more alarming. □


63
New catechism is safe, patristic, predictable

( June 17, 1994) I have been dreading writing this article ever since the day too many months back when I picked up a copy of the French edition of the Catechism of the Catholic Church at the Paris airport. How could my feelings of irritation be kept in check?

Perhaps the best way would be to concentrate on Part 4, devoted to Christian prayer, which concludes the volume. Here, I told myself, we can avoid theological controversy and test whether the book is really communicating.

Moreover, this section has been praised by Bernard Häring who declared that he "would like to see it published separately in a handsome format, accessible to everyone."

I wish I could share his enthusiasm. Most of what this section has to say is unexceptional. And there's the rub. For what is obvious and unexceptional is also unexciting. One is very conscious that it is translated from the French, and that it has been thought in French. This is the best of French spirituality of the 1960s.

Here it is on le coeur, the heart, echoing the admirable Vocabulaire de la théologie biblique published in 1962. It is the heart that prays. If our hearts are far from God, the words on our lips are vain. Then: "The heart is our hidden center, beyond the grasp of our reason and of others; only the Spirit of God can fathom the human heart and know it fully. The heart is the place of decision, deeper than our psychic drives. It is the place of truth, where we choose life or death. It is the place of encounter, because as image of God, we live in relation; it is the place of covenant" (2563).

A deep insight is struggling to come to birth here through the Gallic rhetoric: something to do with the way we relate to God on the deepest level of our being. Some religious literary allusions

-272-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pope John Paul II and the Church
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.