Lies!, Lies!!, Lies!!! The Psychology of Deceit

By Charles V. Ford | Go to book overview

Chapter 11
Technological
Detection of Deceit

Personally, I have grave reservations about so-called lie detector tests.

-- Secretary of State George Shultz,
December 20, 1985

Faced with the importance of knowing when someone is lying and recognizing the fallibility of humans as lie detectors, people have, through the ages, sought external means to determine the presence of deceit. In recent years, the polygraph has been used for that purpose. The extensive use of this device to monitor the honesty of employees, governmental officials, and criminals (among others) has been notably controversial.


Brief History of Lie Detection

Efforts to detect deception undoubtedly extend back to the first interactions among humans. One of the first recorded incidents is in the biblical story of two women who each claimed a baby as her own. They appeared before King Solomon, who, to resolve the con-

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lies!, Lies!!, Lies!!! The Psychology of Deceit
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter 1 - Everybody Lies 1
  • Summary 21
  • Chapter 2 - Defining Deceit: The Language of Lying 23
  • Summary 45
  • Chapter 3 - The Biology of Deceit 47
  • Summary 66
  • Chapter 4 - Learning to Lie: Developmental Issues in Deceit 69
  • Summary 86
  • Chapter 5 - Why People Lie. the Determinants of Deceit 87
  • Summary 101
  • Chapter 6 - Styles of Deception: The Role of Personality 103
  • Summary 129
  • Chapter 7 - Pathological Lying 133
  • Summary 146
  • Chapter 8 - Living a Lie: Impostors, Con Artists, and Persons with Munchausen Syndrome 147
  • Summary 170
  • Chapter 9 - False Memories, False Accusations, and False Confessions 173
  • Summary 194
  • Chapter 10 - Detection of Deceit 197
  • Summary 219
  • Chapter 11 - Technological Detection of Deceit 221
  • Summary 234
  • Chapter 12 - Therapeutic Approaches for the Deceitful Person 237
  • Summary 248
  • Chapter 13 - Effects of Deception 251
  • Summary 270
  • Chapter 14 - A Psychology of Deceit: Conclusions and Summary 271
  • Summary 283
  • Epilogue 287
  • References 289
  • Index 317
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.