The Letters of William and Dorothy Wordsworth: The Later Years Part I: 1821-1828 - Vol. 3

By William Wordsworth; Dorothy Wordsworth et al. | Go to book overview

APPENDIX II
Preface and Table of Contents from Allan
Cunningham's Proposed Selection of Wordsworth
(see L. 369)

Preface.

This little volume was suggested by several of the admirers of the genius of Mr Wordsworth and though the Poet permitted the undertaking he is neither accountable for the selection nor for the arrangement. It was felt that his poetry had been too long withheld from the lower classes of the community whose feelings and sympathies it appeared so well calculated to awaken. The original power of thought: the deep sympathy with nature: the philosophical grandeur and the supremacy claimed for genius and nature over the artificial dignitaries of the earth which distinguish all his works seemed calculated to secure popular affection had not the progress of his fame been materially retarded by the price of his works and by the captiousness of Criticism. It is the object of this selection to place his poetry within the reach of the more simple and unsophisticated classes of the People--to lay before them a series of verses full of social and philosophical feeling--exhibiting manifold images of domestic love and home-bred enjoyment and counting nothing too humble in which the hand of God is seen and poetic emotions called forth. Some little has been conceded to popular taste in making these Selections--much has been omitted that was lofty and profound and much that spoke to the universal sympathies of human nature: but there is enough given to enable the people at large to taste the spirit of one of their most exquisite Poets.

-703-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Letters of William and Dorothy Wordsworth: The Later Years Part I: 1821-1828 - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations xi
  • Abbreviations xii
  • List of Letters xv
  • Introduction xxv
  • Appendix I Edward Quillinan's Recollections of His First Meeting with Wordsworth (see L. 37) 701
  • Appendix II Preface and Table of Contents from Allan Cunningham's Proposed Selection of Wordsworth (see L. 369) 703
  • Preface. 703
  • Index 705
  • Addendum 730
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.