Pioneering Research in Surgical Shock and Cardiovascular Surgery: Vivien Thomas and His Work with Alfred Blalock : an Autobiography

By Vivien T. Thomas | Go to book overview

2

Early in February 1930, I asked Charles Manlove, a very close friend of mine with whom I had grown up, if there were any openings for jobs at Vanderbilt University, where he was employed. He worked for Dr. Ernest W. Goodpasture in the Department of Bacteriology. I explained the situation I was in and the freeze I had put on my money. Charles told me that he knew of a job opening with Dr. Blalock at the school, but he said he understood the guy was "hell" to get along with and didn't think I'd be able to work with him. I told him that things were so tight I'd have to take my chances; I had to have some source of income.

The next morning, February 10, 1930, Charles and I went to the Medical School. We found that Dr. Blalock was scheduled in the operating room that morning, so Charles took me to the bacteriology laboratory in which he worked, preparing sterile culture media which at that time were not commercially available for the hospital and laboratory. We returned to the Experimental Surgery Laboratory around 11 a.m. When we arrived, Dr. Blalock was crossing the hall on the way to his office with a Coca Cola in his hand. Charles introduced me to Dr. Alfred Blalock at the doorway. Since Charles had told me that he was in charge of the laboratory, I expected, at the least, a mature, middle-aged person. Instead, Dr. Blalock looked more like a college senior or a medical school student. He was very cordial and polite. He thanked Charles for bringing me and invited me into his office, which was actually an individual laboratory. It held a desk, a swivel chair, two laboratory stools, a wooden animal operating table placed in front of a sink, and three pieces of apparatus (see fig. 1). I later learned that the pieces of equipment mounted on the workbench which ran across the laboratory beneath the windows were Van Slyke-Neill blood gas manometers. The apparatus on a wooden table in the corner by the sink was a Benedict-Roth spirometer. Dr. Blalock offered me a seat on one of the stools and he sat on the other, drinking his Coke and smoking.

His manner was very easygoing, quiet but serious. He first asked me if I had finished high school. He then asked if I had plans to go back to school. When I answered in the affirmative, he wanted to know why I was not then in school. I told him of my financial situation, that I would have to work my way through school. He asked what I would do if I was able to finish college, and I told him I would like to go on to medical school.

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pioneering Research in Surgical Shock and Cardiovascular Surgery: Vivien Thomas and His Work with Alfred Blalock : an Autobiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Prologue xv
  • Part One - The Vanderbilt Years 1
  • 2 9
  • 3 20
  • 4 29
  • 5 41
  • Part Two - The Hopkins Years 51
  • 6 53
  • 7 70
  • 8 80
  • 9 91
  • 10 105
  • 11 114
  • 12 130
  • 13 146
  • 14 156
  • 15 174
  • 16 184
  • 17 194
  • 18 207
  • Part Three - Recognition 217
  • 19 219
  • 20 225
  • References 233
  • Name Index 239
  • Subject Index 243
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.