American Mass-Market Magazines

By Alan Nourie; Barbara Nourie | Go to book overview

Information Sources

BIBLIOGRAPHY

"Ads in Coronet." Business Week, 1 March 1947, pp. 21-22.

"Coronet: Book-Sized Materials Issued for Non-Esquire Minds." News-Week, 31 October 1936, 3.

"'Coronet': Culture in Capsule Form." Literary Digest, 31 October 1936, p. 43.

"Cut-Price Circulation Economics Led to Demise of Coronet, Stein Declares." Advertising Age, 7 July 1961, pp. 6, 52.

"Esquire in Talks to Sell Coronet: Company Denies Macfadden Has Part in Negotiations." New York Times, 21 June 1961, p. 47.

"Final Touches." Newsweek, 24 July 1961, p. 45.

Freeman, William M. "Betty Crocker, General Mills, Coronet Join Forces in New Idea." New York Times, 2 December 1956, sec. 2, p. 10F.

Major, Ralph H., Jr. "Read Before You Write." Writer, December 1948; pp. 401-403.

"New Man at Coronet." Newsweek, 4 November 1955, p. 98.

O'Gara, James. "End of a Magazine." Commonweal, 29 September 1961, p. 32.

"Out Looking." Newsweek, 3 July 1961, p. 71.


INDEX SOURCES

Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature. ( 1948-1961).


LOCATION SOURCES

Library of Congress, many other libraries. Available in microform.


Publication History

MAGAZINE TITLE AND TITLE CHANGES

Coronet, 1936-1961.


VOLUME AND ISSUE DATA

Vol. 1-vol. 50, no. 6, November 1936-October 1961.


PUBLISHERS AND PLACE OF PUBLICATION

Coronet, Inc. (part of Esquire, Inc.) and Esquire, Inc. Chicago. David A. Smart, 1936-1952; Gordon Carroll, 1953-1955; no publisher, January 1956; Arthur Stein, February 1956-October 1961.


EDITORS

Arnold Gingrich, November 1936-August 1938; Arnold Gingrich and Bernard Geis, September 1938-February 1942; Oscar Dystel and Bernard Geis, March- December 1942; Bernard Geis and Harris Shevelson, 1943-March 1945; Oscar Dystel, editor-in-chief, April 1945-June 1948; Gordon Carroll, executive editor, 1946-July 1948; Gordon Carroll, August 1948-1952; Fritz Bamberger, 1953- February 1956; Lewis W. Gillenson, March 1956-October 1961.


CIRCULATION

Spring 1961: 3,100,000; October 1961: 2,000,000 (estimate).

Katherine Dahl


COSMOPOLITAN

First published in 1886, Cosmopolitan (Cosmo) has metamorphosed radically in its hundred-year history of publication. Current readers of the new Cosmo wouldn't recognize the older version of the title, and the Victorians would have

-78-

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American Mass-Market Magazines
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • A 3
  • The American Farmer 3
  • American Heritage 7
  • American Magazine and Historical Chronicle 12
  • American Mercury 13
  • The American Whig Review 18
  • Argosy 29
  • Atlantic Monthly 32
  • C 47
  • Changing Times 47
  • The Columbian Lady's and Gentleman's Magazine 58
  • Cosmopolitan 78
  • Crawdaddy 88
  • D 95
  • Debow's Review 95
  • E 103
  • F 119
  • G 131
  • H 149
  • Health 152
  • High Times 161
  • Home Mechanix 165
  • Horizon 170
  • I 177
  • K the Kiplinger Magazine. See Changing Times 181
  • L 193
  • Liberty 195
  • Life 207
  • Lippincott's Magazine 213
  • Littell's Living Age 222
  • Look 225
  • M 235
  • Mcclure's Magazine 247
  • N 271
  • National Police Gazette 284
  • Niles' Weekly Register 329
  • O 341
  • P/Q 349
  • Parade 349
  • People Weekly 359
  • Playboy 367
  • Playgirl 375
  • Popular Science: the What's New Magazine 385
  • Prevention Magazine 399
  • Psychology Today 404
  • R 419
  • Reader's Digest 425
  • Rolling Stone 442
  • S 445
  • Saturday Review 452
  • Scribner's Magazine 458
  • The Smart Set 467
  • Smithsonian 474
  • Sunset 479
  • T 491
  • Travel-Holiday 507
  • True Story 510
  • Tv Guide 519
  • U 529
  • Usa Weekend 531
  • U.S. News and World Report 534
  • V 547
  • Vanity Fair 547
  • Village Voice 551
  • Vogue 556
  • W 561
  • Index 585
  • Contributors 605
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