American Mass-Market Magazines

By Alan Nourie; Barbara Nourie | Go to book overview

O

OMNI

Omni--another successful Bob ( Penthouse) Guccione creation--came to be, according to its creator, as something "summoned up from the frost-cool morning of my youth. Omni, born in the breathless dreams of that long-ago child. . . . It was much smaller then . . . a joy . . . the size of a matchbox . . . a flat, thumb polished, silvery case bursting with exotic wires and tubes. . . . When I held it to my forehead, I could see the future." 1

Notwithstanding what the mystery of this silvery case might be, Omni has survived almost two decades now, and will continue to "see" into the future of scientific fact and fancy. Are science and art really compatible? Judging by the glossy, silvery, colorful pages of stunning photography and artistic reproductions, perhaps Omni proves that they can be. Indeed, Omni's greatest contribution to the futuristic/scientific milieu is this effort to enhance the awareness of patterns, colors, and the artistic creativity one can find in the lowest forms of life, or in the abstract designs of computer graphics. True to the promise of its publisher, Omni has displayed in its pages the best of modern and contemporary art--from Marc Chagall and Fernando Botero to Salvador Dali, Pablo Picasso, and René Magritte. The October 1986 special anniversary issue bore a futuristic Botticelli Venus on the cover. Omni's graphic design and layout pays homage to symbolism, as in the silvery pages of Continuum contrasted with the red against black of the Anti-Matter column, as well as in the illustrations for the science fiction stories it publishes. Omni has published some of the most outstanding science fiction of our times, and the magazine has received numerous prizes for its artistic and overall quality, such as the Overseas and the Westinghouse Press awards.

According to Kathy Keeton, president of Omni Corporation, and Guccione's partner, "People are interested not in the nuts and bolts of science, but in its

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American Mass-Market Magazines
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • A 3
  • The American Farmer 3
  • American Heritage 7
  • American Magazine and Historical Chronicle 12
  • American Mercury 13
  • The American Whig Review 18
  • Argosy 29
  • Atlantic Monthly 32
  • C 47
  • Changing Times 47
  • The Columbian Lady's and Gentleman's Magazine 58
  • Cosmopolitan 78
  • Crawdaddy 88
  • D 95
  • Debow's Review 95
  • E 103
  • F 119
  • G 131
  • H 149
  • Health 152
  • High Times 161
  • Home Mechanix 165
  • Horizon 170
  • I 177
  • K the Kiplinger Magazine. See Changing Times 181
  • L 193
  • Liberty 195
  • Life 207
  • Lippincott's Magazine 213
  • Littell's Living Age 222
  • Look 225
  • M 235
  • Mcclure's Magazine 247
  • N 271
  • National Police Gazette 284
  • Niles' Weekly Register 329
  • O 341
  • P/Q 349
  • Parade 349
  • People Weekly 359
  • Playboy 367
  • Playgirl 375
  • Popular Science: the What's New Magazine 385
  • Prevention Magazine 399
  • Psychology Today 404
  • R 419
  • Reader's Digest 425
  • Rolling Stone 442
  • S 445
  • Saturday Review 452
  • Scribner's Magazine 458
  • The Smart Set 467
  • Smithsonian 474
  • Sunset 479
  • T 491
  • Travel-Holiday 507
  • True Story 510
  • Tv Guide 519
  • U 529
  • Usa Weekend 531
  • U.S. News and World Report 534
  • V 547
  • Vanity Fair 547
  • Village Voice 551
  • Vogue 556
  • W 561
  • Index 585
  • Contributors 605
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