The Man Who Knew Too Much

By Gilbert K. Chesterton | Go to book overview

VIII
THE VENGEANCE OF THE STATUE

IT was on the sunny veranda of a seaside hotel, overlooking a pattern of flower beds and a strip of blue sea, that Horne Fisher and Harold March had their final explanation, which might be called an explosion.

Harold March had come to the little table and sat down at it with a subdued excitement smoldering in his somewhat cloudy and dreamy blue eyes. In the newspapers which he tossed from him on to the table there was enough to explain some if not all of his emotion. Public affairs in every department had reached a crisis. The government which had stood so long that men were used to it, as they are used to a hereditary despotism, had begun to be accused of blunders and even of financial abuses. Some said that the experiment of attempting to establish a peasantry in the west of England, on the lines of an early fancy of Horne Fisher's, had resulted in nothing but dangerous quarrels with more industrial neighbors. There had been particular complaints of the ill treatment of harmless foreigners, chiefly Asiatics, who hap-

-225-

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The Man Who Knew Too Much
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • The Man Who Knew Too Much 1
  • II - The Vanishing Prince 34
  • III - The Soul of the Schoolboy 66
  • IV - The Bottomless Well 89
  • V - The Fad of the Fisherman 116
  • VI - The Hole in the Wall 147
  • VII - The Temple of Silence 185
  • VIII - The Vengeance of the Statue 225
  • The Trees of Pride 259
  • II - The Wager of Squire Vane 286
  • III - The Mystery of the Well 312
  • IV - The Chase After the Truth 340
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