Zanzibar under Colonial Rule

By Abdul Sheriff; Ed Ferguson | Go to book overview

Introduction
A Materialist Approach
to Zanzibar's History

ABDUL SHERIFF

Zanzibar, which consists of the islands of Unguja and Pemba, may be considered only a dot in the Indian Ocean. With an area of about 1,000 square miles and a population of half a million, it is indeed a small place. However, it is a territory with a long history which has evoked romantic notions far beyond its shores; more importantly, it has occupied a prominent place in the history of eastern Africa. There was a popular saying in Zanzibar during the nineteenth century that

When one pipes in Zanzibar
They dance on the lakes. 1

But the tune that was being played was not one of political control, for the Sultan's sway did not extend beyond the narrow coastal belt even at the height of his power. Zanzibar did control the external trade of a large part of the region, but it must be remembered that, in the pre-capitalist period before the imposition of colonial rule, production of commodities for export to the outside world formed only a small proportion of the total production of East African societies. As a result of its political and economic pre-eminence at the coast, however, Zanzibar did develop as a seat of learning and a centre of Swahili culture, a fountainhead of Kiswahili and Islam from which the language and the religion were disseminated over a vast region of middle Africa. This is the enduring cultural contribution of Zanzibar to the history not only of East Africa but of humankind in general.

These aspects of the apparently more glorious pre-colonial history of Zanzibar have received a fair share of historical attention. 2 There is, however, a more urgent need to study the recent

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Zanzibar under Colonial Rule
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contributors vi
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction a Materialist Approach to Zanzibar's History 1
  • Notes 7
  • Part One Political Economy of Zanzibar 9
  • One: the Transition from Slavery 1873-1914 11
  • Introduction 11
  • Two: The Formation of a Colonial Economy 1915-1945 36
  • Three: The Struggle for Independence 1946-1963 79
  • Part Two Class Formation 107
  • Four: the Peasantry Under Imperialism 1873-1963 109
  • Notes 136
  • Five: the Decline of the Landlords 1873-1963 141
  • Six: The Contradictions of Merchant Capital 1840-1939 163
  • Seven: The Development of a Colonial Working Class 188
  • Appendix A 213
  • Appendix B 214
  • Appendix C 215
  • Appendix D 218
  • Eight: The 1964 Revolution 220
  • Conclusion 249
  • Notes 261
  • Bibliography 262
  • Index 271
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.