Trial without Jury and Other Plays

By John Howard Payne; Codman Hislop et al. | Go to book overview

ACT II.

SCENE: A room in the farmhouse. At the top of the stage, a door and two latticed windows, looking into the street of the village. The windows have shutters. A buffet and straw chairs. A basket of plate. On the table several piles of plates, some glasses, etc. In one corner of the room hangs the magpie's cage, with the bird in it.

The day has just broken. At the rise of the curtain the stage lights are yet low, the shutters closed; but it is evident by the door, which is open, that it is day on the outside.

Rosalie, alone, at the door, looking out.

ROS. That provoking Jew! He has really gone! Is he not ashamed to offer me so little? What can my father do with such a trifle? But time presses. If the Jew does not return, I must run after him and take anything he chooses to give. But, look! It is broad daylight! First let me open the shutters, and then I'll go -- [She goes on talking while she is opening the shutters. As they open, the lamps gradually rise, and the stage becomes entirely light] Why wasn't that vile Jew at his inn last night? If my father does not find the money, what will he do? Will he wait till night and then put himself on the way? Surely it will be so! For he will doubtless know it has been impossible. Ah! The Jew comes back! I'll engage he offers me something more. [Enter Isaac]

Is. Young voman! I can kive four three-shilling pieces. I cannot kive a shingle farthing more.

ROS. Twelve shillings! That's not one-third of its value. I must have stolen the spoon to let it go for that.

Is. Dot's not my pusiness.

ROS. What an insult! Is. Vell, miss, very vell! I -- I gives vive pieces.

ROS, No, no, you may take yourself off.

Is. Vell, child! I co-- I co-- [Makes a few steps]

ROS. [Aside] Nay! It is time to finish --

Is. [Returning] Den, tou art young, and tou art pretty, and pecause vor dat, I gives de zix.

ROS. There, then take it. [Delivering the spoon]

Is. Oh, vicked girl! You crudges mine boor profits! [Aside] I vas nigh do give sheven. [He draws three six-shilling pieces out of a little bag]

ROS. [Impatiently] Make haste! Someone may come, and I do not wish --

-24-

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Trial without Jury and Other Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • John Howard Payne 1791-1852 xi
  • Trial Without Jury; Or, the Magpie and the Maid 1
  • Act I 7
  • Act II 24
  • Act III 38
  • Mount Savage 55
  • Act I 59
  • Act II 69
  • Act III 80
  • The Boarding Schools; Or, Life Among the Little Folks 91
  • Act I 95
  • The Two Sons-In-Law 113
  • Act I 117
  • Act II 127
  • Act III 135
  • Act IV 146
  • Act V 154
  • Mazeppa; Or, the Wild Horse of Tartary 163
  • Act I 167
  • Act II 181
  • Act III 193
  • The Spanish Husband; Or, First and Last Love 205
  • Act I 211
  • Act II 225
  • Act III 246
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