Trial without Jury and Other Plays

By John Howard Payne; Codman Hislop et al. | Go to book overview

youth, the first sentiments of my life: honor, loyalty, virtue! [With nobleness] Come, thou mayst confide in me!

ELOD. [With a suppliant voice] None, I may not follow, till my uncle shall have given his consent to the union. He is my sole relation. 'Tis he who stands in place of the unfortunate father a cruel prince has snatched from me.

UN. [Aside] St. Maur! Frightful remembrance! [Aloud] Pardon, Elodie, a moment of delirium. You, to love me? You, to follow me to the desert? To become my companion! What dared I hope? Am I deserving of such a sacrifice? Merit I so great a happiness? I? Oh, no! My mad wishes outrage Heaven and earth; so this dream of a moment succeeds a frightful waking. Farewell. I render myself justice. You are free. Return into the priory. As to me, I exile myself from this valley. You will see me no more.

ELOD. I shall see you no more!

UN. At least till a new danger comes to menace you. Elodie, if the succor of the Solitary can yet be useful to you, the fires lighted on the tower of the priory will inform him, and soon you will see him reappear. Adieu, I go to dig my tomb. [Lost, beside himself, and fearing himself, he departs by the little gate]

ELOD. Unfortunate Elodie! [She is about to fall on the steps of the little chapel, when Marceline runs in, followed by young girls, and sustains her. They carry her out fainting]


ACT III.

[SCENE:] The summit of Mount Savage. On all sides appear the tops of green trees and an immense extent of sky. A winding path cut in the rock is the only road for travellers. Its most elevated point is nearly in the middle of the stage, and its irregular declivity conducts to the right and left under the stage, in sight of the spectators. A little by-way, extremely abrupt, which communicates with the road, leads to the cabin of the Solitary, of which the entry is perceptible at the left extremity, on the summit of the mountain. This rough and wild site should be picturesque. It is moonlight. The Count de Palzo climbs painfully the road. He arrives by the right and sits down on a rock, in front of the scene.

COUNT. Fatigue overwhelms me. I shall pause here till day appears and leads me to those of my people whom I left behind. I have yielded in appearance, and for some hours only, to the ascendancy this extraordinary man exercises over me. Besides, it was difficult to preserve the presence of mind in an event so unforeseen, in the circumstance the most strange. I shall not

-80-

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Trial without Jury and Other Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • John Howard Payne 1791-1852 xi
  • Trial Without Jury; Or, the Magpie and the Maid 1
  • Act I 7
  • Act II 24
  • Act III 38
  • Mount Savage 55
  • Act I 59
  • Act II 69
  • Act III 80
  • The Boarding Schools; Or, Life Among the Little Folks 91
  • Act I 95
  • The Two Sons-In-Law 113
  • Act I 117
  • Act II 127
  • Act III 135
  • Act IV 146
  • Act V 154
  • Mazeppa; Or, the Wild Horse of Tartary 163
  • Act I 167
  • Act II 181
  • Act III 193
  • The Spanish Husband; Or, First and Last Love 205
  • Act I 211
  • Act II 225
  • Act III 246
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