Trial without Jury and Other Plays

By John Howard Payne; Codman Hislop et al. | Go to book overview

ACT II.

SCENE: The same as the former. Enter Amélie and Dervière.

DER. Did I not forbid your returning hither? Am I to be obeyed or not, miss?

AMÉL. Nay, Papa, be not so severe. You will not be angry at my disobedience when you learn the cause. Grandpapa comes today to take up his abode beneath this roof. You know that he is never much attended to; and at this moment, when so many things interfere, will be less so than ever. I was anxious to see to his apartment with my own eyes, and to be sure of his having all his little comforts about him.

DER. Alas, 'tis all for nothing! Are you not aware, my dear, that they decline receiving your good grandpapa here.

AMÉL. How!

DER. A splendid gala is to be given. They wish to put him off upon me till tomorrow, under the pretense of his being annoyed at the bustle and the crowd. I'll not keep him an instant.

AMÉL. Why not?

DER. Not that it would not give me the greatest pleasure; I would he were with us always. Nothing could delight me more, but I am determined to humble the pride of your uncle. So! gratitude is grown a bother to him! He takes no interest in the old gentleman -- nay, blushes at his city air. No wonder, in the age we live in the least dignities change men's hearts. Even if he would have had the civility to see me, but no, the gentleman was not at leisure and by his steward he has this very moment made his high commands known to me. [Enter Comtois, with a little portmanteau on his back] Ah, you here, Comtois? You are come to fix here, hey?

COM. Yes, we remove for six months, fortune be praised!

DER. Are you alone?

COM. I precede my master. You'll see him presently. If we have not been here ere now, no thanks to your people. Their memory, sir, is now and then excessively treacherous. They are the most extraordinary forgetters of dated! It was scarcely the twenty-third of last month, when they told me, "Pack up, the first is come."

DER. This chap never agrees with anybody. He's always disputing, always making some difficulty --

COM. I!

DER. A sluggard --

COM. Sir!

-127-

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Trial without Jury and Other Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • John Howard Payne 1791-1852 xi
  • Trial Without Jury; Or, the Magpie and the Maid 1
  • Act I 7
  • Act II 24
  • Act III 38
  • Mount Savage 55
  • Act I 59
  • Act II 69
  • Act III 80
  • The Boarding Schools; Or, Life Among the Little Folks 91
  • Act I 95
  • The Two Sons-In-Law 113
  • Act I 117
  • Act II 127
  • Act III 135
  • Act IV 146
  • Act V 154
  • Mazeppa; Or, the Wild Horse of Tartary 163
  • Act I 167
  • Act II 181
  • Act III 193
  • The Spanish Husband; Or, First and Last Love 205
  • Act I 211
  • Act II 225
  • Act III 246
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