Trial without Jury and Other Plays

By John Howard Payne; Codman Hislop et al. | Go to book overview

ACT III.

[SCENE: Same as the former] Enter Madame Dalainville and Dalainville.

DAL. We must be silent, madam, on the subject, but most certainly I shall get into the Ministry.

MME. DAL. You a Minister!

DAL. It is no longer a secret at Court.

MME. DAL. How have you discovered it?

DAL. In the reception I met with there. Every eye fixed upon me seemed at once to declare it. I saw my enemies forced to smile on me. Everything already announces my greatness at hand. I am met everywhere with the most humble and fawning air; one might say that each divining my power strives to make his court to me before the other. Yes, all saluting me with the gentlest looks seem to say: Sir, I shall stand in need of you.

MME. DAL. In that case we must increase the magnificence of our establishment, add instantly to the numbers of our servants, twelve footmen, two coachmen, a running footman; behind my carriage I must have a chasseur. I would have presently the most beautiful equipages.

DAL. If this on you will stand in need of pages.

MME. DAL. There is another object of much greater importance, about which I must occupy myself instantly. I shall take a rather more showy livery. The one we have now is not brilliant enough. One is not perceived in the crowd. I would have my name known by my colors.

DAL. [Apart] I shall begin by creating a number of plans. We must make friends by spreading favors.

MME. DAL. We must have an estate.

DAL. [Apart] Aye, well --

MME. DAL. That's indispensable. Paris in the fine season is so gloomy that it terrifies one, but in the country there what pleasure one feels! A charm of paradise! All Paris is to be met there, and then solitude has a thousand attractions for me! One cannot make a step without one's heart melting! I idolize the calm seclusion of the woods! But don't forget we must have a private theater in our park? Nay, you do not answer me. Are you not enchanted?

DAL. We will see to all that when I shall be appointed. [Enter a footman]

FOOT. Sir, your brother-in-law. [Exit]

DAL. Come, I suppose he has heard something of the report.

MME. DAL. Oh! how mortally tiresome he is with his philanthropy! I leave you with him. [Exit Madame Dalainville. Enter Dervière]

-135-

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Trial without Jury and Other Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • John Howard Payne 1791-1852 xi
  • Trial Without Jury; Or, the Magpie and the Maid 1
  • Act I 7
  • Act II 24
  • Act III 38
  • Mount Savage 55
  • Act I 59
  • Act II 69
  • Act III 80
  • The Boarding Schools; Or, Life Among the Little Folks 91
  • Act I 95
  • The Two Sons-In-Law 113
  • Act I 117
  • Act II 127
  • Act III 135
  • Act IV 146
  • Act V 154
  • Mazeppa; Or, the Wild Horse of Tartary 163
  • Act I 167
  • Act II 181
  • Act III 193
  • The Spanish Husband; Or, First and Last Love 205
  • Act I 211
  • Act II 225
  • Act III 246
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