Cubism and Twentieth-Century Art

By Robert Rosenblum | Go to book overview

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Colorplates
I. Pablo Picasso. Les Demoiselles d'' Avignon. 1907. Oil on canvas, 96 x 92". The Museum of Modem Art, New York (Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest)
II. Pablo Picasso. Still Life with Skull. 1907. Oil on canvas, 45¼ x 34⅝". The Hermitage Museum, Leningrad
III. Pablo Picasso. Nude in the Forest (La Grande dryade). 1908. Oil on canvas, 731¼ x 42⅛". The Hermitage Museum, Leningrad
IV. Pablo Picasso. Fruit and Wineglass. 1908. Gouache on wood, 10⅝ x 8⅝". Private collection
V. Pablo Picasso. Landscape. 1908. Watercolor, 24¾ x 18⅝". Collection Hermann Rupf, Bern
VI. Georges Braque. Houses at L'Estaque. 1908. Oil on canvas, 28¾ x 23⅝". Collection Hermann Rupf, Bern
VII. Pablo Picasso. Still life with Go#rd. 1909. Oil on canvas, 28¾ X 23⅝". Private collection, Pails
VIII. Pablo Picasso. Portrait of Ambroise Vollard. 1909- 10. Oil on canvas, 36¼ x 259/16". Pushkin Museum, Moscow
IX. Georges Braque. Still Life with Violin and Pitcher. 1909-10. Oil on canvas, 46½ x 28¾". Kunstmuseum, Basel
X. Georges Braque. The Portuguese. Spring 1911. Oil on canvas, 45⅞ x 32⅛. Kunstmuseum, Basel.
XI. Pablo Picasso. Ma Jolie (Woman with Guitar). Winter 1911-12. Oil on canvas, 39⅜ x 25¾". The Museum of Modern Art, N. Y. (Acquired through Lillie p. Bliss Bequest)
XII. Pablo Picasso. Violin. 1913. Oil and sand on canvas, 259/16 x 18⅛". Collection He,mann Rupf, Bern
XIII. Georges Braque. The Clarinet. 1913. Pasted paper, chazcoal, chalk, and oil on canvas, 37½ x 47⅜". Private collection, New York
XIV. Pablo Picasso. Still life in a Landscape. 1915. Oil on canvas, 24⅜ x 29½". Collection Heinz Berggruen, Paris
XV. Pablo Picasso. Dog and Cock. 1921. Oil on canvas, 61 x 30¼". Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven (Gift of Stephen C. Clark)
XVI. Georges Braque. Still Life with Guitar and Fruit, 1924. Oil and sand on canvas, 45⅝ x 23⅝". Private collection, France
XVII. Pablo Picasso. Still Life with Guitar. 1924. Oil on canvas, 38⅜ x 51⅛". Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam
XVIII. Juan Gtis. Still Life with Bottles. 1912. Oil on canvas, 21½ x 18⅛". Rijksmuseum Kröller-Müller, Otterlo, Holland
XlX. Juan Gris. The Watch (The Sherry Bottle). 1912. Oil and pasted papers on canvas, 25¾ x 36¼". Collection G. David Thompson, Pittsburgh
XX. Juan Gris. Still Life Before an Open Windov: Place Ravigtan, 1915. Oil on canvas, 45⅞ x 35⅛". Philadelphia Museum of Art (Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection)
XXI. Juan Gris. Guitar with Sheet of Music. 1926. Oil on canvas, 25⅝ xn 31⅞". Collection Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Saidenberg, New York
XXII. Femand Léger. Nudes in the Forest. 1909-10. Oil on canvas, 47¼ x 67". Rijksmuseum Kröller-Müller, Otterlo, Holland.
XXIII. Femand lager. The Stairway. 1913. Oil on canvas, 56¾ X 46½". Kunsthaus, Zurich
XXIV. Femand Léger. The Cardplajers. 1917. Oil on canvas, 50⅞ x 76". Rijksmuseum Krö11er-Müller, Otterlo, Holland
XXV. Fernand Léger. Animated landscape: Man and Dog. 1921. Oil on canvas, 25⅝ x 36¼". Private collection, Paris
XXVI. Robert Delaunay. Homage to Blériot. 1914. Watercolor on canvas, 987/16 x 987/16". Collection Mine. E. Gazel, Paris
XXVII. Marcel Duchamp. Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 1. 1911. Oil on cardboard, 37¾ x 23½". Philadelphia Museum of Art (Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection)
XXVIII. Jacques Villon. Marching Soldiers. 1913. Oil on canvas, 259/16 x 36¼". Galerie Louis Carré, Paris
XXIX. Roger de La Fresnaye. The Conquest of the Air. 1913. Oil on canvas, 92⅞ x 77". The Museum of Modem Art; New York (Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund)

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