All Our Lives: Alice Duer Miller

By Henry Wise Miller | Go to book overview

II

Here's my hand.
And mine, with my heart in it.

AT twenty-five minutes to two on Sunday afternoon, February 26, 1899, I came downstairs in a hurry, late for Sunday lunch, to be introduced to Alice Duer standing before her future mother-in-law's fireplace. From the doorway of my mother's drawing room to where Alice stood is about fourteen feet. I was buttoning the lower button of a new white waistcoat as I crossed the threshold; looking up, I saw Alice by the fireplace. Somewhere, in that interval, my life changed. Three days later she promised to marry me.

A few months earlier I had passed Alice without knowing it, which has always disturbed me. She had been in the reviewing stand as the crew of the Yankee marched up Broadway, after being mustered out after the Spanish War. I was at the end of a file and looked into the flag-draped box of dignitaries, as we saluted. My only recollection is that the jumper of the man ahead of me was black with sweat.

At that time the world's supply of crude rubber came from forest trees in the jungles of Brazil. No one knew whether rubber would grow in a cultivated state. I had interested the General Electric Company in the possibility of growing rubber under cultivation and was sailing for Costa Rica in a few days. A week later I left for Central America.

After a few months' prospecting I was able to return to New York and Alice and I were married. We left at once for Costa Rica.

-44-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
All Our Lives: Alice Duer Miller
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • I 3
  • II 44
  • III 100
  • IV 158
  • V 172
  • Acknowledgments *
  • VI 197
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 234

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.