ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Originally a Cambridge Ph.D. thesis submitted in the summer of 1972, this study could not have been written without the help of a great many people: in particular, I would like to thank Professor R. M. Cook for his patient criticism of my ideas and for his useful comments upon the drafts; Dr. N. Yalouris for suggesting the subject to me, for allowing me access to the Epidaurus sculptures and for permitting me to make use of some of his conclusions; Professor Chr. Christou and Dr. A. Demakopoulou for letting me work on the fragments recently excavated by them; Dr. A. Delivorrias and Dr. G. Steinhauer for their permission to make use of the Tegea material formerly and presently under their care; Mr. P. M. Fraser and Dr. H. Catling for their tireless energy in obtaining permits from the Greek authorities; and Professor B. Ashmole for his invaluable advice and support, and for his excellent photographs of the Mausoleum friezes, here reproduced on plates 34-41.

My thanks also go to Professor E. B. Harrison, Professor P. W. Lehmann, Professor C. M. Robertson, Professor A. H. F. Thornton, Professor A. D. Trendall, Dr. M. Gjödesen, Dr. G. M. A. Hanfmann, Dr. H. Plommer, Dr. M. Vickers, Dr. G. B. Waywell, Mrs. B. R. Brown and Mrs. S. Karouzou for the information and assistance they have supplied; to Dr. P. Houghton for his help with points of anatomy; to the staffs of the various museums in which I have worked (especially the British Museum, the Museum of Classical Archaeology in Cambridge, the National Museum in Athens, and the Tegea Museum); to Mrs. Barbara Hird, Mrs. Margot Wylie and my wife for their help with secretarial work at Tegea and in Athens; to Mrs. Elizabeth Glass and Mrs. Susan Stark for typing the manuscript; and to Miss Marion Steven for agreeing to read and check it.

As for illustrations, the drawings are largely the work of Mr. Murray Webb; my photographs were printed by Mr. Evan Jones, Mr. Morris Seden and Mr. Martin Fisher. Plate 45a is reproduced by permission of the Archivio Fotografico dei Musei Communali ( Museo Capitolino); plates 34b; 35a, b; 36; 37a, b; 38a, b; 39; 41b and 46b by kind permission of Professor B. Ashmole; plates 26, 27a and 47a by permission of the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut (Athenische Abteilung); plates 27b and 28c by permission of the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut (Istanbuler Abteilung); plates 33c and d; 46a; 50c and d and 51b by the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut (Römische Abteilung); plate 45b by permission of the Director of Antiquities and the Cyprus Museum; plate 44a by courtesy of the Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University; plate 49b by kind permission of Dr. J. Frel; plate 42a and b by permission of the J. Paul Getty Museum; plates 24c and 49a by permission of Hirmer Fotoarchiv, Munich; plate 48b and c by permission of Kaufmann, Munich; plate 31a-c by permission of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; plate 49c and d by permission of the Metropolitan Museum of Art; plate 45c by permission of Savio, Rome; plate 32d by permission of the Skulpturensammlung, Dresden; plates 28b; 29c; 43a-c by permission of the Staatliche Museen, Berlin; and plates 34a; 40; 41a and c by courtesy of the Trustees of the British Museum.

Finally, I wish to record my gratitude to the Department of Education and Science, to the Walston Fund, and to the University of Otago Grants Committee for awarding the grants without which this book could not have been written.

Andrew Stewart

-vi-

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Skopas of Paros
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations (at End) ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction: Methods of Approach 1
  • Part I: the Tegea Sculptures 5
  • Chapter One - Technique 39
  • Chapter Two - Composition 48
  • Chapter Three - Iconography and Interpretation 59
  • Chapter Four - Style 70
  • Chapter Five - Skopas in Tegea 80
  • Part Ii: Skopas 85
  • Chapter Six - Antecedents 85
  • Appendix 90
  • Chapter Eight Skopas in Asia 101
  • Chapter Nine Late Works 110
  • Part Iii: Documentation 126
  • Appendix 1 the Literary Sources 126
  • Notes 135
  • Appendix 2 Classical, Hellenistic and Roman Representations of the Calydonian Hunt 136
  • Appendix 3 the Arcadian Dynasty 138
  • Appendix 4 Copies of Major Works Considered in Chafters 7-9 139
  • Appendix 5 Proportions of the Los Angeles Herakles, Lansdowne Herakles and Meleager (cf. Plates 31, 42 and 44) 147
  • Select Bibliography 149
  • Notes 152
  • General Index 177
  • Index of Sources 183
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